Globally-distributed Serverless App in 100 Lines of Code

Mikhail Shilkov Mikhail Shilkov
Globally-distributed Serverless App in 100 Lines of Code

Pulumi is excellent at connecting multiple cloud components into a cohesive application. In my previous post, I introduced the way to mix JavaScript or TypeScript serverless functions directly into the cloud infrastructure programs.

Today, I will build a serverless application with both the data store and the HTTP endpoint located close to end users to ensure prompt response time. The entire application runs on top of managed Azure services and is defined as a single Pulumi program in TypeScript.

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Hosting a Static Website on Azure with Pulumi

Mikhail Shilkov Mikhail Shilkov
Hosting a Static Website on Azure with Pulumi

Static websites are back in the mainstream these days. Website generators like Jekyll, Hugo, or Gatsby, make it fairly easy to combine templates and markdown pages to produce static HTML files. Static assets are the simplest thing to serve and cache, so the whole setup ends up being fast and cost-efficient. Many platforms offer services to host such static websites. This post explains the steps to create the infrastructure to do so on Microsoft Azure.

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ECS vs Fargate vs EKS: The Lowdown on Containers in AWS

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
ECS vs Fargate vs EKS: The Lowdown on Containers in AWS


Amazon offers multiple solutions for running containers in AWS, through its managed Elastic Container Service (ECS). This includes three major approaches: ECS managed automatically with Fargate, ECS backed by EC2 instances, and Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS), delivering the full power of Kubernetes. It’s not always easy to choose between these, so in this article we provide some basic guidance on the tradeoffs you’ll encounter when choosing.

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Building and Publishing Docker Images to an ECR Repository

Cyrus Najmabadi Cyrus Najmabadi
Building and Publishing Docker Images to an ECR Repository

Amazon Elastic Container Registry (ECR) is a fully-managed Docker container registry that makes it easy for developers to store, manage, and deploy Docker container images. ECR is integrated with Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS), including for Kubernetes (EKS), simplifying your development to production workflow, securing access through IAM, and eliminating the need to operate your own container repositories or worry about scaling the underlying infrastructure. ECR hosts your images in a highly available and scalable architecture, allowing you to reliably deploy containers for your applications. In this article, we’ll see how Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS lets you use infrastructure as code to easily build, publish, and pull from private ECR repositories.

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AWS CloudWatch made easy with Pulumi Infrastructure-as-Code

Cyrus Najmabadi Cyrus Najmabadi
AWS CloudWatch made easy with Pulumi Infrastructure-as-Code

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS modules can be used to get first class insights and visualizations directly inside your Pulumi application.

As cloud applications tend to be long-lived, we think it’s vital that it be possible to get regular insights on the performance of the application at all times. Using Crosswalk for AWS Pulumi applications allow you to easily define and visualize the appropriate metrics that show the health of your services, create alarms to let you know when something is wrong, and easily create dashboards to get live visualization of what is happening in the cloud. Because this is vital to the health of the application, we think this should be something built in from the start, and not something added after the fact as an out of band artifact.

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Mapbox IOT-as-code with Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS

Chris Toomey Chris Toomey
Mapbox IOT-as-code with Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS

Guest Author: Chris Toomey, Solution Architect Lead @ Mapbox

With 8 billion+ connected IoT devices and 2 billion GPS-equipped smartphones already online, logistics businesses are tracking assets at every step in the supply chain. At this scale and complexity, it is imperative to have a flexible way to ingest, process, and act upon this data, without sacrificing security or best practices.

To meet this need, Mapbox has created an Asset Tracking Solution that uses Pulumi’s open source JavaScript libraries (AWS, AWSX) available with multi-language support with Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS. Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS is an open source framework that streamlines creation, deployment and management of AWS services with built-in AWS Best Practices and minimal lines of code in common programming languages.

In this blog, we will show snippets of the Javascript code that embraces the power of Pulumi to program AWS service APIs to create the Mapbox solution. To see the full architecture in action with a live bike race across America, please refer to this webinar recorded on June 13th 2019 and the Mapbox asset tracking solution. Also refer to this blog of the Race across America showcased live during the webinar tomorrow.

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Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Luke Hoban Luke Hoban
Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Amazon Web Services provides an incredible platform for developers to build cloud-native applications, and is used by millions of customers of all sizes. The building block services that AWS offers enable teams to offload undifferentiated heavy-lifting to AWS. To maximally benefit from these services though, cloud engineering teams must learn how to compose all of these building blocks together to build and deliver their own applications. Today, this is still too hard. Getting from your laptop to a production-ready AWS deployment frequently takes days or weeks instead of minutes or hours. And AWS building block services frequently leave you to re-implement (and re-discover) best-practices instead of providing these as smart defaults.

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS is a new open source library of infrastructure-as-code components that make it easier to get from zero to production on AWS, easier to adopt AWS best practices by default, and easier to evolve your AWS infrastructure as your application needs mature.

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Using Terraform Remote State with Pulumi

Paul Stack Paul Stack

While some people coming to Pulumi are entirely new to Infrastructure as Code, increasingly teams are moving from other tools - whether cloud-specific in the form of CloudFormation or ARM Templates, or cloud-agnostic tools such as Terraform. In these organizations, new infrastructure provisioned with Pulumi must co-exist with existing resources provisioned with other tools, and often by different teams. For example, it’s common to see an application team deploying into a VPC owned and managed by a network operations team.

Pulumi supports this kind of workflow natively using the StackReference type from the Pulumi SDK. Integration with the most popular cloud-specific tools have been supported by Pulumi since the earliest days:

We recently added similar support for reading the outputs of a Terraform state file - both from local .tfstate files, and from all of the remote state backends supported by Terraform. This is exposed via the terraform.state.RemoteStateReference type in the @pulumi/terraform NPM package.

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Create Secure Jupyter Notebooks on Kubernetes using Pulumi

Nishi Davidson Nishi Davidson
Create Secure Jupyter Notebooks on Kubernetes using Pulumi

In this post, we will work through an example that shows how to use Pulumi to create Jupyter Notebooks on Kubernetes. Having worked on Kubernetes since 2015, a couple of critical benefits jump out that may resonate with you as well:

  • You write everything in code - TypeScript in our example here.
  • You need not initialize Tiller or Helm to work with existing Helm charts like nginx-ingress-controller that we use here.
  • The security patterns in Helm and Tiller are no longer concerns, rather you get to focus on the RBAC of the actual service which is Jupyter-notebook in this example.
  • You accomplish more with less YAML and iteratively work towards your use cases.

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