Cyrus Najmabadi

Cyrus Najmabadi

Software Engineer

Building and Publishing Docker Images to a Private Amazon ECR Repository

Building and Publishing Docker Images to a Private Amazon ECR Repository

Amazon Elastic Container Registry (ECR) is a fully-managed Docker container registry that makes it easy for developers to store, manage, and deploy Docker container images. ECR is integrated with Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS), including for Kubernetes (EKS), simplifying your development to production workflow, securing access through IAM, and eliminating the need to operate your own container repositories or worry about scaling the underlying infrastructure. ECR hosts your images in a highly available and scalable architecture, allowing you to reliably deploy containers for your applications. In this article, we’ll see how Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS lets you use infrastructure as code to easily build, publish, and pull from private ECR repositories.

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AWS CloudWatch made easy with Pulumi Infrastructure-as-Code

AWS CloudWatch made easy with Pulumi Infrastructure-as-Code

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS modules can be used to get first class insights and visualizations directly inside your Pulumi application.

As cloud applications tend to be long-lived, we think it’s vital that it be possible to get regular insights on the performance of the application at all times. Using Crosswalk for AWS Pulumi applications allow you to easily define and visualize the appropriate metrics that show the health of your services, create alarms to let you know when something is wrong, and easily create dashboards to get live visualization of what is happening in the cloud. Because this is vital to the health of the application, we think this should be something built in from the start, and not something added after the fact as an out of band artifact.

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Simple Serverless programming with Google Cloud Functions and Pulumi

Pulumi lets you create, deploy, and manage Google Cloud applications and infrastructure in familiar languages like JavaScript, TypeScript, and Python, and without needing to learn new DSLs or YAML templating solutions. This means great productivity and getting to use tools you already know and love. Since serverless is all about focusing more on your application code, and less on infrastructure and configuration toil, we absolutely love Google Functions.

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Simplified Outputs in Pulumi 0.17

Simplified Outputs in Pulumi 0.17

Based on much feedback from cloud developers, Pulumi Outputs have been simplified for JavaScript and TypeScript making the user experience simpler while maintaining the rich dependency tracking and type checking that Pulumi has always provided for cloud infrastructure.

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Serverless on AWS with Pulumi: simple, event-based functions

One of Pulumi’s goals is to provide the simplest way possible to do serverless programming on AWS by enabling you to create cloud infrastructure with the real programming languages that you are already using today. We believe that the existing constructs already present in these languages, like flow control, inheritance, composition, and so on, provide the right abstractions to effectively build up infrastructure in a simple and familiar way.

In a previous post we focused on how Pulumi could allow you to simply create an AWS Lambda out of your own JavaScript function. While this was much easier than having to manually create a Lambda Deployment Package yourself, it could still be overly complex to integrate these Lambdas into complete serverless application.

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Lambdas as Lambdas: The magic of simple serverless Functions

Lambdas as Lambdas: The magic of simple serverless Functions

Pulumi’s approach to infrastructure as code uses real languages instead of YAML or DSLs. One major advantage of this approach is that AWS Lambdas, Azure Functions, Google Cloud Functions, et al. can just be real language lambdas, offering a flexible and simple path to serverless.¬†Such functions behave as normal functions, allowing you to treat serverless code as part of your application instead of separate “infrastructure” that needs to be configured, managed, and versioned manually. In this post, we’ll examine this capability in JavaScript, which is already very function- and callback-oriented, making serverless feel like a natural extension of the language we already know and love.¬†

While Functions as a Service (FaaS) systems have become more popular, getting up and running can still feel overly complex compared to normal application development. FaaS offerings today divide the development experience between “infrastructure” – doing all the work to configure the Lambda runtime itself (i.e. how much memory to use, what environment variables should be present, etc.) – and writing and maintaining the code that will execute in the function itself when triggered. Most developers just want to focus on the latter, write some code, and have it work.

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Running a Serverless Node.js HTTP Server on AWS and Azure

The newly introduced cloud.HttpServer in Pulumi makes it easy to serve a standard Node.js HTTP server as a serverless API on any cloud platform.  This new API brings together the flexibility and rich ecosystem of Node.js HTTP servers, the cost and operational simplicity of serverless APIs, and the multi-cloud authoring and deployment of Pulumi.  In this post, we walk through some of the background on why we introduced this new API and how it fits into the Node.js HTTP ecosystem.

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Advanced TypeScript type FTW!

Advanced TypeScript type FTW!

We at Pulumi love TypeScript for cloud apps and infrastructure, because of its rich type system and great ahead-of-time typechecking ‚Äď making for a more productive inner loop and helping to find errors sooner. The typesystem magic behind how this works for infrastructure as code can be fascinating!

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Using Pulumi with AWS SQS and Lambdas

Two weeks ago Amazon added Simple Queue Service (SQS) as a supported event source for Lambda. SQS is one of AWS’s oldest services, providing access to a powerful message queue that can do things like guarantee messages will be delivered at least once, or messages that will be processed in the same order they were received in. Adding SQS as a supported event source for Lambda means that now it’s possible to use SQS in a serverless computing infrastructure, where Lambdas are triggered in response to messages added to your SQS queue. Now, instead of needing some sort of Service dedicated to polling your SQS queue, or creating Simple Notification Service (SNS) notifications from your messages, you can instead just directly trigger whatever Lambda you want.

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