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Posts Tagged serverless

Running Container Images in AWS Lambda

Running Container Images in AWS Lambda

When AWS Lambda launched in 2014, it pioneered the concept of Function-as-a-Service. Developers could write a function in one of the supported programming languages, upload it to AWS, and Lambda executes the function on every invocation.

Ever since then, a zip archive of application code or binaries has been the only supported deployment option. Even AWS Lambda Layers—reusable components automatically merged into the application code—used the zip packaging format.

Today, AWS announced that AWS Lambda now supports packaging serverless functions as container images. This means that you can deploy a custom Docker or OCI image as an AWS Lambda function.

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Architecture as Code: Serverless

Architecture as Code: Serverless

In this fourth installment of Architecture as Code series, we’ll take a look at serverless, an architectural pattern that has quickly gained popularity among cloud practitioners. There are two reasons why serverless usage has proliferated: a cost-saving pay as you go model and elasticity that goes from zero to as many as needed to complete the task without managing servers.

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Controlling AWS Costs with Pulumi and AWS Lambda

Controlling AWS Costs with Pulumi and AWS Lambda

Due to the nature of the product we build, the Pulumi team needs to have access to several cloud providers to develop and test the product. An increasing number of cloud providers comes with an associated ever-increasing cost.

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Architecture as Code

Architecture as Code

Abstraction is key to building resilient systems because it encapsulates behavior and decouples code, letting each component perform its function independently. The same principles apply to infrastructure, where we want to declare behavior or state and not implementation details. As an industry, we’ve moved away from monolithic applications to distributed systems such as serverless, microservices, Kubernetes, and virtual machine deployments. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the characteristics of these architectures and how Pulumi can abstract the components that comprise these systems.

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Scheduling Serverless

Scheduling Serverless

Scheduling events has long been an essential part of automation; many tasks need to run at specific times or intervals. You could be checking StackOverflow for new questions every 20 minutes or compiling a report that is emailed every other Friday at 4:00 pm. Today, many of these tasks can be efficiently accomplished in the cloud. While each cloud has its flavor of scheduled functions, this post steps you through an example using AWS CloudWatch with the help of Pulumi.

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Intro to AWS Serverless Step Functions

Intro to AWS Serverless Step Functions

AWS Step Functions lets you build applications by connecting AWS services. Daisy-chaining steps into a workflow simplifies application development by creating a state machine diagram which shows how services are connected to each other in your application. We’ll go into the details of creating a lambda function, IAM roles and policies, and creating a workflow. Once we have the example deployed, we’ll walk through the process of adding another function and step to the workflow. Included in the walkthrough is a discussion of one of the aspects of the Pulumi programming model. The goal of this article is to provide a foundation for building your application using serverless workflows.

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Google Cloud Run: Serverless Containers

Google Cloud Run: Serverless Containers

Google Cloud Run is the latest addition to the serverless compute family. While it may look similar to existing services of public cloud, the feature set makes Cloud Run unique: Docker as a deployment package enables using any language, runtime, framework, or library that can respond to an HTTP request. Automatic scaling, including scale to zero, means you pay for what you consume with no fixed cost and no management overhead.

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Provisioned Concurrency: Avoiding Cold Starts in AWS Lambda

Provisioned Concurrency: Avoiding Cold Starts in AWS Lambda

AWS Lambda cold starts (the time it takes for AWS to assign a worker to a request) are a major frustration point of many serverless programmers. In this article, we will take a look at the problem of latency-critical serverless applications, and how Provisioned Concurrency impacts the status-quo. Concurrency Model of AWS Lambda Despite being serverless, AWS Lambda uses lightweight containers to process incoming requests. Every container, or worker, can process only a single request at any given time.

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Pulumi Watch: Fast Inner Loop Development for Infrastructure

Pulumi Watch: Fast Inner Loop Development for Infrastructure

A big part of our vision with Pulumi is to bring application developers and infrastructure teams closer together in the cloud. That includes both providing infrastructure teams with better software engineering tools, as well as providing developers with easier access to cloud infrastructure. We are often inspired by looking at great software engineering experiences in other development stacks and applying them to the cloud infrastructure space. Whether it be general-purpose languages and rich IDEs, testing and package management, or components and rich APIs, at Pulumi, we’ve repeatedly applied successful development tools and practices to the challenges of building and scaling modern cloud infrastructure.

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Azure Functions on Kubernetes with KEDA

Azure Functions on Kubernetes with KEDA

Azure Functions is a managed service for serverless applications in the Azure cloud. More broadly, Azure Functions is a runtime with multiple hosting possibilities. KEDA (Kubernetes-based Event-Driven Autoscaling) is an emerging option to host this runtime in Kubernetes.

In the first part of this post, I compare KEDA with cloud-based scaling and outline the required components. In the second part, I define infrastructure as code to deploy a sample KEDA application to an Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) cluster.

The result is a fully working example and a high-level idea of how it works. Kubernetes expertise is not required!

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