Posts Tagged configuration

Deploy Static Websites to AWS using 10 lines of YAML

Deploy Static Websites to AWS using 10 lines of YAML

The AWS Static Website component makes it easy to deploy an AWS S3 static website and, optionally, add a CloudFront content distribution network (CDN). While you can use any of the programming languages Pulumi supports (TypeScript, JavaScript, Python, Go, .NET, Java, and YAML), the component is particularly useful if you use YAML or JSON. With the AWS Static Website component, you’ll have a complete, functioning site in a few minutes. Without it, you can spend hours or even days to get the same result.

Read more →

Shared configuration stacks with AWS Systems Manager

Shared configuration stacks with AWS Systems Manager

One thing I love about Pulumi is how easy it is to configure a stack. As a builder mainly of web applications, I’m always thinking about how I’ll configure my apps from one environment to the next, and being able to use Pulumi’s built-in support for configuration and secrets to manage the API keys and database credentials for my dev, staging, and production stacks individually is incredibly convenient. For larger teams and organizations, though, where multiple applications rely on a set of common configuration settings — dozens of apps, say, depending on the the same API service or database — having to keep all of those config settings in sync across all of those individually can become a bit of a pain.

Read more →

Deploy WordPress to AWS using Pulumi and Ansible

Deploy WordPress to AWS using Pulumi and Ansible

There are two primary kinds of infrastructure as code tools: configuration management, like Ansible, Chef, and Puppet, which configure, patch, or upgrade existing servers, and provisioning, like Pulumi, Terraform, and CloudFormation, which create, update, and delete the underlying infrastructure itself. Provisioning has taken over from configuration management as the dominant form of IaC over the past decade as we’ve shifted to modern immutable infrastructure architectures that use containers, serverless, and managed services. And yet, configuration management still remains important and relevant, especially for heritage, stateful, server-centric, and on-prem or hybrid solutions. The good news is that it doesn’t need to be either-or choice: the two approaches are complementary. In this post, you’ll see how and why you might combine them by deploying a WordPress Server to AWS by provisioning infrastructure with Pulumi and configuring the server with Ansible.

Read more →