Posts Tagged AWS

Run Your Own RSS Server on AWS with Pulumi

Run Your Own RSS Server on AWS with Pulumi

It’s been a few years since Google shut down Google Reader, and while a number of nice commercial alternatives have sprung in its wake, none of them has ever been quite the right fit for me personally.

So a while back, after far too much time spent wandering the blogsphere manually, typing URLs into address bars by hand, I decided to go looking to see whether the universe had produced an open-source solution to this problem — and to my surprise and delight, it had! Miniflux is an excellent little open-source RSS server and reader, written in Go and backed by PostgreSQL, that also happens to be packaged as a Docker container. So in this post, I’ll show how easy it is to deploy a Miniflux server of your own on AWS, using only Pulumi and a few lines of TypeScript.

Read more →

Persisting Kubernetes workloads with Amazon EFS CSI volumes using Pulumi open source SDKs

Persisting Kubernetes workloads with Amazon EFS CSI volumes using Pulumi open source SDKs

The Amazon Elastic File System Container Storage Interface (CSI) Driver implements the CSI specification for container orchestrators to manage the lifecycle of Amazon EFS filesystems. The CSI specification defines an interface along with the minimum operational and packaging recommendations for a storage provider to implement a CSI compatible plugin. The interface declares the RPCs that a plugin must expose. The CSI drivers are the right mechanism to work with, when using a cloud storage component with Kubernetes workloads.

Read more →

Running Containers in AWS, the Lowdown: ECS, Fargate, and EKS

Running Containers in AWS, the Lowdown: ECS, Fargate, and EKS

Amazon offers multiple solutions for running containers in AWS, through its managed Elastic Container Service (ECS). This includes three major approaches: ECS managed automatically with Fargate, ECS backed by EC2 instances, and Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS), delivering the full power of Kubernetes. It’s not always easy to choose between these, so in this article we provide some basic guidance on the tradeoffs you’ll encounter when choosing.

Read more →

AWS CloudWatch made easy with Pulumi Infrastructure-as-Code

AWS CloudWatch made easy with Pulumi Infrastructure-as-Code

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS modules can be used to get first class insights and visualizations directly inside your Pulumi application.

As cloud applications tend to be long-lived, we think it’s vital that it be possible to get regular insights on the performance of the application at all times. Using Crosswalk for AWS Pulumi applications allow you to easily define and visualize the appropriate metrics that show the health of your services, create alarms to let you know when something is wrong, and easily create dashboards to get live visualization of what is happening in the cloud. Because this is vital to the health of the application, we think this should be something built in from the start, and not something added after the fact as an out of band artifact.

Read more →

Mapbox IOT-as-code with Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS

Mapbox IOT-as-code with Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS

Guest Author: Chris Toomey, Solution Architect Lead @ Mapbox

With 8 billion+ connected IoT devices and 2 billion GPS-equipped smartphones already online, logistics businesses are tracking assets at every step in the supply chain. At this scale and complexity, it is imperative to have a flexible way to ingest, process, and act upon this data, without sacrificing security or best practices.

To meet this need, Mapbox has created an Asset Tracking Solution that uses Pulumi’s open source JavaScript libraries (AWS, AWSX) available with multi-language support with Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS. Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS is an open source framework that streamlines creation, deployment and management of AWS services with built-in AWS Best Practices and minimal lines of code in common programming languages.

In this blog, we will show snippets of the Javascript code that embraces the power of Pulumi to program AWS service APIs to create the Mapbox solution. To see the full architecture in action with a live bike race across America, please refer to this webinar recorded on June 13th 2019 and the Mapbox whitepaper. Also refer to this blog of the Race across America showcased live during the webinar tomorrow.

Read more →

Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Amazon Web Services provides an incredible platform for developers to build cloud-native applications, and is used by millions of customers of all sizes. The building block services that AWS offers enable teams to offload undifferentiated heavy-lifting to AWS. To maximally benefit from these services though, cloud engineering teams must learn how to compose all of these building blocks together to build and deliver their own applications. Today, this is still too hard. Getting from your laptop to a production-ready AWS deployment frequently takes days or weeks instead of minutes or hours. And AWS building block services frequently leave you to re-implement (and re-discover) best-practices instead of providing these as smart defaults.

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS is a new open source library of infrastructure-as-code components that make it easier to get from zero to production on AWS, easier to adopt AWS best practices by default, and easier to evolve your AWS infrastructure as your application needs mature.

Read more →

Continuous Delivery with GitLab and Pulumi on Amazon EKS

Continuous Delivery with GitLab and Pulumi on Amazon EKS

In this blog, we will work through an example that shows how to use Pulumi to enable GitLab-based continuous delivery with your Kubernetes workloads on Amazon EKS. This integration will work just as seamlessly for any Kubernetes cluster, including Azure AKS or Google GKE, using the relevant Pulumi libraries for Azure and GCP.

Read more →

Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

The Docker Getting Started tutorial shows how to develop, build, and run a modern containerized application, from a single custom Docker container published to the Docker Hub, to a scaled out service with load balancing. But there are challenges: it requires you to program in YAML, run (or script) many CLI commands, and manage your own Swarm or Kubernetes cluster. There is an easier way. By using Pulumi’s infrastructure as code, we can build a custom Docker image, publish it to a private AWS container registry, and spin up an AWS Fargate load balanced service running that container, all in 28 lines of TypeScript code and a single pulumi up command. The result leverages the best of what AWS has to offer, with the entire platform at your fingertips, with a single approach. In this article, we’ll see how.

Read more →

Simplify Kubernetes RBAC in Amazon EKS with open source Pulumi packages

One of the most common areas Kubernetes operators struggle with in production involves creating and managing role-based access control (RBAC). This is so daunting that RBAC is often not implemented, or implemented halfway, or the configuration becomes impossible to maintain.

Fortunately, Pulumi makes RBAC on Kuberenetes so easy that you’ll never create an insecure cluster again. In this post, we will contrast the traditional way of working with RBAC on EKS with using Pulumi.

Read more →

Protecting Your APIs with Lambda Authorizers and Pulumi

Protecting Your APIs with Lambda Authorizers and Pulumi

Creating serverless applications just got even easier! You can now protect your application APIs in just three easy steps. We’ve already posted about how easy it is to create serverless apps in Pulumi. Now, we’re helping you simplify protecting those apps with API Gateway and Lambda authorizers.

With Pulumi’s new AWSX package, you can quickly define a Lambda and an AWS Lambda authorizer to protect it. We’re once again harnessing the power of Lambdas as Lambdas to allow developers to focus on writing code.

Today, we will walkthrough creating a simple serverless app using AWS and Pulumi. We will simplify implementing the OAuth protocol by using Auth0 and AWS Lambda authorizers to authorize users. Auth0 provides a universal authentication and authorization platform for applications. It has become an extremely popular platform for user management because Auth0 makes OAuth easy.

Read more →