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Posts Tagged AWS

Migrating a cloud application to Kubernetes

Migrating a cloud application to Kubernetes

In this blog post, we will explore and demonstrate the advantages of Kubernetes by converting and deploying our PERN application to Amazon EKS. With the help of Pulumi, the process becomes greatly simplified and allows us to focus more on the big picture of designing our cloud architecture.

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Deploying an OAuth Server for Netlify's CMS

Deploying an OAuth Server for Netlify's CMS

In our previous post, we deployed our CMS app on AWS instead of Netlify. We couldn’t use Netlify’s Identity Service, which manages GitHub access to Netlify CMS, because we deployed on AWS. As a result, we needed to implement an external OAuth Server.

We used Netlify’s Go example to deploy on ECS Fargate and configure the domain and certificate. To deploy the application on Fargate, we used a Typescript Pulumi project. This is a polyglot application where the OAuth server is implemented in Go and the infrastructure is deployed with Typescript. We’ll show how we accomplished the deployment.

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Deploying a PERN stack application to AWS

Deploying a PERN stack application to AWS

In this blog post, we will explore PERN stack applications and deploy one to AWS. PERN is an acronym for PostgreSQL, Express, React, and Node. A PERN stack application is a project that uses PostgreSQL, Express as an application framework, React as a user interface framework, and runs on Node. We will also use Pulumi Crosswalk to reduce the amount of code and provide a quick and straightforward path for deploying the application.

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Deploying Netlify CMS on AWS with Pulumi

Deploying Netlify CMS on AWS with Pulumi

Netlify CMS is an open-source content management system that provides UI for editing content and adopting Git workflow. Initially, we want to take advantage of it to increase efficiency to edit Pulumi’s website. However, during development, we found few examples are deploying the CMS application on AWS instead of Netlify, its home platform. Therefore, in this blog post, we would like to share how to organize Netlify’s file structure and use Pulumi to store the content on S3 buckets, connect to CloudFront, and configure certificate in Certificate Manager.

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Deploying a MySQL schema using Dynamic Providers

Deploying a MySQL schema using Dynamic Providers

In our previous post, we created a Python voting application using Flask and Redis. This blog post will explore creating a MySQL database and initializing it with a schema and data. What seems to be a simple step is much more interesting than it appears, because Pulumi’s MySQL provider does not support creating and populating tables. To do it, we will extend it with a Dynamic Provider.

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Using Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) with AWS Lambda

Using Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) with AWS Lambda

Ever since AWS Lambda was released in 2015, users have wanted persistent file storage beyond the small 512MB /tmp disk allocated to each Lambda function. The following year, Amazon launched EFS, offering a simple managed file system service for AWS, but initially only available to mount onto Amazon EC2 instances. Over the last few months, AWS has been extending access to EFS to all of the modern compute offerings. First EKS for Kubernetes, then ECS and Fargate for containers. Today, AWS announced that EFS is now also supported in Lambda, providing easy access to network file systems from your serverless functions.

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Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

A Jamstack is a modern architecture for building websites; JAM stands for JavaScript, APIs, and Markup. Jamstacks are deployed on a CDN, and content is stored on a cloud services provider. In addition to the speed and simplicity of deploying static content served from a CDN, there are other advantages such as maintaining content with git, modern build tools to generate the static content, automated builds, atomic deploys, and instant cache validation.

While build tools have simplified the process of creating content ready for deployment on a CDN, creating the infrastructure to serve the content remains complicated. You can use a cloud provider’s web interface or script the build using a CLI tool if you want to manage your infrastructure instead of using a hosted solution. The alternative is to use infrastructure as code tool to automate building and deploying cloud resources. This article demonstrates how to create a jamstack website and deploy it on AWS using Pulumi.

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