Posts Tagged aws

Using Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) with AWS Lambda

Using Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) with AWS Lambda

Ever since AWS Lambda was released in 2015, users have wanted persistent file storage beyond the small 512MB /tmp disk allocated to each Lambda function. The following year, Amazon launched EFS, offering a simple managed file system service for AWS, but initially only available to mount onto Amazon EC2 instances. Over the last few months, AWS has been extending access to EFS to all of the modern compute offerings. First EKS for Kubernetes, then ECS and Fargate for containers. Today, AWS announced that EFS is now also supported in Lambda, providing easy access to network file systems from your serverless functions.

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Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

A Jamstack is a modern architecture for building websites; JAM stands for JavaScript, APIs, and Markup. Jamstacks are deployed on a CDN, and content is stored on a cloud services provider. In addition to the speed and simplicity of deploying static content served from a CDN, there are other advantages such as maintaining content with git, modern build tools to generate the static content, automated builds, atomic deploys, and instant cache validation.

While build tools have simplified the process of creating content ready for deployment on a CDN, creating the infrastructure to serve the content remains complicated. You can use a cloud provider’s web interface or script the build using a CLI tool if you want to manage your infrastructure instead of using a hosted solution. The alternative is to use infrastructure as code tool to automate building and deploying cloud resources. This article demonstrates how to create a jamstack website and deploy it on AWS using Pulumi.

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Controlling AWS Costs with Pulumi and AWS Lambda

Controlling AWS Costs with Pulumi and AWS Lambda

Due to the nature of the product we build, the Pulumi team needs to have access to several cloud providers to develop and test the product. An increasing number of cloud providers comes with an associated ever-increasing cost.

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Automatically Enforcing AWS Resource Tagging Policies

Automatically Enforcing AWS Resource Tagging Policies

AWS publishes best practices for how to tag your resources for cost tracking, automation, and organization. But how do you enforce that you’re doing it correctly across all of your projects? And is it really necessary to manually track down all those places where you missed a tag and manually patch things up? In this article, we’ll see how to use Policy as Code to enforce your team’s tagging strategies in addition to some powerful Infrastructure as Code techniques to automate applying your tags in a consistent way across all of your projects and resources.

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Modern Cloud Infrastructure in Go - The Road to 2.0

Modern Cloud Infrastructure in Go - The Road to 2.0

Here at Pulumi, everyone on our engineering team is a Gopher. Go has quickly become the “language of the cloud,” and so when we chose to build our open-source pulumi/pulumi engine and SaaS backend, we chose Go. As such, we are very excited to welcome Go to the family of supported infrastructure as code languages as part of Pulumi 2.0. What is Pulumi? Go has become the lingua franca of cloud-native infrastructure development.

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Manage Any Infrastructure with Policy as Code

Manage Any Infrastructure with Policy as Code

In an earlier article, we introduced examples of Policy as Code to prevent two of the most common causes of data breaches. Policies are the guardrails of infrastructure. They control access, set limits, and manage how infrastructure operates. In many systems, policies are created by clicking on a GUI, making it difficult to replicate or version. Pulumi implements policy by writing it in Typescript, which ensures that you can write policies using software development practices such as automated testing, deployment, and version control.

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Provisioned Concurrency: Avoiding Cold Starts in AWS Lambda

Provisioned Concurrency: Avoiding Cold Starts in AWS Lambda

AWS Lambda cold starts (the time it takes for AWS to assign a worker to a request) are a major frustration point of many serverless programmers. In this article, we will take a look at the problem of latency-critical serverless applications, and how Provisioned Concurrency impacts the status-quo. Concurrency Model of AWS Lambda Despite being serverless, AWS Lambda uses lightweight containers to process incoming requests. Every container, or worker, can process only a single request at any given time.

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AWS EKS - How to Scale Your Cluster

AWS EKS - How to Scale Your Cluster

AWS Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) provides a range of performance and control for dynamically scaling your Kubernetes clusters, including Managed Node Groups, Fargate, and Manually-Managed Node Groups in EC2. In this post, we’ll see how to use each of these compute options, and when to prefer one over the other in order to maximize productivity, flexibility, and control, based on your needs.

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Running AWS IAM Access Analyzer at Deployment Time

Running AWS IAM Access Analyzer at Deployment Time

Yesterday AWS announced an exciting new feature — the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) Access Analyzer — a service powered by automated reasoning that detects potentially-insecure access to your AWS resources, including S3 Buckets, SQS Queues, Lambdas, and more. At the same time, Pulumi announced a new policy as code solution, CrossGuard, that validates policies at deployment time. The question is: Can IAM Access Analyzer and Pulumi CrossGuard be combined to get the best of both solutions?

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