Posts Tagged aws

Deploying Amazon EKS Anywhere on Bare Metal

Deploying Amazon EKS Anywhere on Bare Metal

Some of the largest and most complex deployments that teams manage are hybrid and multi-cloud deployments. Kubernetes is a common component in these deployments because it enables platform teams to provide a common set of services across cloud and on-premises infrastructure and simplifies the process of migrating and scaling workloads as demand fluctuates. Pulumi simplifies these deployment scenarios but teams often need to manage different flavors of Kubernetes for on-premises deployments versus cloud deployments.

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Shared configuration stacks with AWS Systems Manager

Shared configuration stacks with AWS Systems Manager

One thing I love about Pulumi is how easy it is to configure a stack. As a builder mainly of web applications, I’m always thinking about how I’ll configure my apps from one environment to the next, and being able to use Pulumi’s built-in support for configuration and secrets to manage the API keys and database credentials for my dev, staging, and production stacks individually is incredibly convenient. For larger teams and organizations, though, where multiple applications rely on a set of common configuration settings — dozens of apps, say, depending on the the same API service or database — having to keep all of those config settings in sync across all of those individually can become a bit of a pain.

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Deploy WordPress to AWS using Pulumi and Ansible

Deploy WordPress to AWS using Pulumi and Ansible

There are two primary kinds of infrastructure as code tools: configuration management, like Ansible, Chef, and Puppet, which configure, patch, or upgrade existing servers, and provisioning, like Pulumi, Terraform, and CloudFormation, which create, update, and delete the underlying infrastructure itself. Provisioning has taken over from configuration management as the dominant form of IaC over the past decade as we’ve shifted to modern immutable infrastructure architectures that use containers, serverless, and managed services. And yet, configuration management still remains important and relevant, especially for heritage, stateful, server-centric, and on-prem or hybrid solutions. The good news is that it doesn’t need to be either-or choice: the two approaches are complementary. In this post, you’ll see how and why you might combine them by deploying a WordPress Server to AWS by provisioning infrastructure with Pulumi and configuring the server with Ansible.

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Test-Driven Infrastructure Development with Pulumi and Jest

Test-Driven Infrastructure Development with Pulumi and Jest

When I was a kid growing up in Southern California, there was a phone number you could call to find out what time it was. It was a local number, 853-1212 (easy to remember as the arrangement of the numbers on the keypad made a capital T), and I used it all the time, to set my watch, adjust the alarm clock, fix the display on the VCR. I don’t recall the last time I used it, probably sometime in the mid ’90s, but I do remember clearly the sound of the voice at the other end of the line.

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EKS Blueprints for Pulumi

EKS Blueprints for Pulumi

With the launch of Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) in 2017, it is now easier than ever to build, secure, operate and maintain Kubernetes clusters in the cloud. Notably, EKS removed the need to manage and configure underlying compute resources and scaling for clusters. Further, EKS Anywhere brings many benefits to hybrid and on-premises deployments.

These developments have proved to be a huge leap forward in productivity for teams that manage cloud infrastructure, enabling them to focus their efforts on deploying applications to meet the needs of customers and stakeholders.

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AWS Enterprise Container Management with Pulumi

AWS Enterprise Container Management with Pulumi

Managing containers and Kubernetes clusters are consistently popular topic areas on the Pulumi blog and in our docs. Our customers regularly cite that Pulumi simplifies container management scenarios, making it the primary reason for choosing Pulumi to define, deploy and manage all of their cloud resources. This includes teams that are just starting their cloud journey and spinning up their first project, as well as teams that want to modernize their apps and services with cloud-native architectures or even scale from one to many clouds.

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Deploying Lambda Function URLs

Deploying Lambda Function URLs

Since its introduction in 2014, the AWS Lambda service has steadily grown from ‘functions as a service’ to a powerful serverless platform that enables cloud engineers to run code without provisioning or managing underlying infrastructure.

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Announcing v5.0.0 of the Pulumi AWS Provider

Announcing v5.0.0 of the Pulumi AWS Provider

We are excited to announce v5.0.0 of the Pulumi AWS Classic provider. The AWS Classic provider is one of the most heavily used providers across the Pulumi ecosystem, and offers access to the full surface area of the upstream Terraform AWS Provider from within Pulumi projects in all supported Pulumi languages. The v5.0.0 release brings a substantial set of fixes and improvements to the provider, including a number of breaking changes as part of the major version release.

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API Gateway to EventBridge with Pulumi

API Gateway to EventBridge with Pulumi

If you’ve spent any time with Amazon API Gateway, you know it’s all about making it easier to manage a serverless REST API. But did you know you can do more with API Gateway than just invoke Lambdas? In this post, you’ll learn how to use Pulumi to connect API Gateway with EventBridge, Amazon’s serverless event bus, to build loosely coupled, scalable and maintainable apps and systems.

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Pulumi and LocalStack — beyond the basics

Pulumi and LocalStack — beyond the basics

Recently, Pulumi community member Josh Graham decided to bootstrap a simple application using a serverless approach, with a focus on using good engineering practices and being able to run the application locally. Given that Josh is the (OG) SaaS architect of Atlassian and an AWS user, LocalStack was a natural choice.

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