Posts Tagged EKS

Persisting Kubernetes workloads with Amazon EFS CSI volumes using Pulumi open source SDKs

Persisting Kubernetes workloads with Amazon EFS CSI volumes using Pulumi open source SDKs

The Amazon Elastic File System Container Storage Interface (CSI) Driver implements the CSI specification for container orchestrators to manage the lifecycle of Amazon EFS filesystems. The CSI specification defines an interface along with the minimum operational and packaging recommendations for a storage provider to implement a CSI compatible plugin. The interface declares the RPCs that a plugin must expose. The CSI drivers are the right mechanism to work with, when using a cloud storage component with Kubernetes workloads.

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Kubernetes Ingress with AWS ALB Ingress Controller and Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS

Kubernetes Ingress with AWS ALB Ingress Controller and Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS

Kubernetes Ingress is an API object that allows you manage external (or) internal HTTP[s] access to Kubernetes services running in a cluster. Amazon Elastic Load Balancing Application Load Balancer (ALB) is a popular AWS service that load balances incoming traffic at the application layer across multiple targets, such as Amazon EC2 instances, in a region. ALB supports multiple features including host or path based routing, TLS (Transport layer security) termination, WebSockets, HTTP/2, AWS WAF (web application firewall) integration, integrated access logs, and health checks.

The AWS ALB Ingress controller is a Kubernetes SIG-AWS subproject - it was the second sub-project added to SIG-AWS after the aws-authenticator subproject. The ALB Ingress controller triggers the creation of an ALB and the necessary supporting AWS resources whenever a Kubernetes user declares an Ingress resource on the cluster. TargetGroups are created for each backend specified in the Ingress resource. Listeners are created for every port specified as Ingress resource annotation. When no port is specified, sensible defaults (80 or 443) are used. Rules are created for each path specified in your ingress resource. This ensures that traffic to a specific path is routed to the correct TargetGroup.

In this post, we will work through a simple example of running ALB based Kubernetes Ingresses with Pulumi EKS, AWS, and AWSX packages.

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Running Containers in AWS, the Lowdown: ECS, Fargate, and EKS

Running Containers in AWS, the Lowdown: ECS, Fargate, and EKS

Amazon offers multiple solutions for running containers in AWS, through its managed Elastic Container Service (ECS). This includes three major approaches: ECS managed automatically with Fargate, ECS backed by EC2 instances, and Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS), delivering the full power of Kubernetes. It’s not always easy to choose between these, so in this article we provide some basic guidance on the tradeoffs you’ll encounter when choosing.

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Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Amazon Web Services provides an incredible platform for developers to build cloud-native applications, and is used by millions of customers of all sizes. The building block services that AWS offers enable teams to offload undifferentiated heavy-lifting to AWS. To maximally benefit from these services though, cloud engineering teams must learn how to compose all of these building blocks together to build and deliver their own applications. Today, this is still too hard. Getting from your laptop to a production-ready AWS deployment frequently takes days or weeks instead of minutes or hours. And AWS building block services frequently leave you to re-implement (and re-discover) best-practices instead of providing these as smart defaults.

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS is a new open source library of infrastructure-as-code components that make it easier to get from zero to production on AWS, easier to adopt AWS best practices by default, and easier to evolve your AWS infrastructure as your application needs mature.

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Simplify Kubernetes RBAC in Amazon EKS with open source Pulumi packages

One of the most common areas Kubernetes operators struggle with in production involves creating and managing role-based access control (RBAC). This is so daunting that RBAC is often not implemented, or implemented halfway, or the configuration becomes impossible to maintain. In this post, we will contrast the traditional way of working with RBAC on EKS with using Pulumi — Pulumi makes RBAC on Kubernetes so easy that you’ll never create an insecure cluster again!

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