Posts Tagged cloud-engineering

Pulumi Is Imperative, Declarative, and Imperative

Pulumi Is Imperative, Declarative, and Imperative

On a regular basis, articles and tweets pass by discussing whether some specific tool is imperative or declarative.

It’s no surprise that Pulumi is often the tool being debated. What if I tell you that Pulumi is imperative, declarative and imperative?

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How Elkjøp Nordic enables self-service infrastructure for developers

How Elkjøp Nordic enables self-service infrastructure for developers

At PulumiUP 2022, Tomas Jansson, software architect at Elkjøp Nordic, gave a presentation on how to enable developers to self-service infrastructure by using Pulumi’s Automation API. Elkjøp Nordic is the leading consumer electronics retailer in the Nordics. The company sells consumer electronics, mobile phones, computers, white goods, domestic appliances, and services linked to these products both directly to consumers and to businesses. It is an omnichannel retailer and serves customers both online and through more than 400 stores.

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Multicloud with Kubernetes and Pulumi

Multicloud with Kubernetes and Pulumi

In this article we’ll show you how to use Pulumi Components and the Pulumi Automation API to make golden path decisions which will both support your customers on multiple different clouds, and enable infrastructure teams and frontend service teams to more easily own their respective parts of your codebase.

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Announcing Infrastructure as Code with Java and Pulumi

Announcing Infrastructure as Code with Java and Pulumi

Today we are excited to announce the preview of Java support for all of your modern infrastructure as code needs. This announcement means that you can build, deploy, and manage your infrastructure, on any cloud—including all of AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, Kubernetes, Oracle Cloud, and more—using Java and other JVM languages. This brings the entire cloud to your fingertips without ever having to leave your code editor, while using production-ready infrastructure as code techniques.

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Pulumi and RedMonk on developer-first infrastructure and why it matters

Pulumi and RedMonk on developer-first infrastructure and why it matters

What do assembly languages and the cloud have in common? Are abstractions the future of cloud computing? What does “infrastructure” really mean? And why do these questions matter to the platform engineers, infrastructure engineers, and developers who are building modern cloud applications today? Joe Duffy (Founder & CEO, Pulumi) and James Governor (Co-founder, RedMonk) recently answered these questions and more in a conversation about developer-first infrastructure. Developer-first infrastructure means empowering developers to build and deploy modern cloud applications and infrastructure through the use of software engineering practices that tame modern cloud complexity.

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Six Things You Might Not Know About the Pulumi Service

Six Things You Might Not Know About the Pulumi Service

As a reader of this blog, you’ve probably heard of the Pulumi Service, the default state-management backend of the Pulumi CLI, and if that’s the case, there’s a good chance you’ve also heard of many of its key features. But did you know we’re adding new features to the Service all the time—some of which are incredibly easy to miss? In this post, we’ll highlight a few of those lesser-known features that we think make it even easier to manage your infrastructure with Pulumi.

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Cloud Systems Part One: Static Sites and AWS S3

Cloud Systems Part One: Static Sites and AWS S3

Cloud engineering is taking over software development. In a lot of ways, this is great; it allows us to build and deploy more complicated applications with less difficulty, and maintaining those applications becomes less troublesome too. We can release smaller updates more quickly than ever, ensuring that we can stay on top of feature requests and security issues. That said, the rise of cloud engineering has also introduced a lot of complexity in the form of dozens of services even within just one cloud provider. Figuring out where to start can be tough, so let’s take a practical tour! In this series, I’ll walk you through building a personal website and deploying it using modern cloud engineering practices.

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Pulumi Recommended Patterns: The basics

Pulumi Recommended Patterns: The basics

As a customer engineer, one of the most rewarding aspects of my work is to listen to customers and our diverse community to learn and share how they succeed in their day-to-day projects. In this 3-article mini-series, we’re going to explore some of the recommended patterns used in the Pulumi community and the benefits of using those patterns. We’ll kick off with all the basic patterns to get you started. Next, as you progress into cloud engineering, we’ll go deeper into evolved patterns.

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Cloud engineering fuels the next chapter of startup innovation

Cloud engineering fuels the next chapter of startup innovation

The story of how the cloud fuels startup innovation seems never ending. In the beginning, AWS birthed cloud computing with its first service, SQS, in 2004 and quickly released several additional services (like S3, EC2, and SimpleDB). From this innovation, startups flourished because they were able to build, experiment, and grow faster than before at much lower cost. Airbnb, Netflix, Zynga, and many more were born, and the rest is history.

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Cloud Engineering Summit Build Track

Cloud Engineering Summit Build Track

The Cloud Engineering Summit 2021 is coming up fast, and the speakers are out! To get you ready to attend, let’s take a look at the sessions for the Build track.

The Cloud Engineering Summit’s three tracks are built around three concepts: Build, Manage, and Deploy. I’m Kat Cosgrove, and I was responsible for selecting your speakers for the Build track! For us, that means building cloud applications and infrastructure with Modern Infrastructure as Code using general purpose programming languages. We embrace the fact that modern cloud applications have blurred the lines between the application and the infrastructure, and that success requires at least some level of proficiency in both. Whether you’re full stack or lean more towards one area, all cloud engineers apply a software engineering mindset and practices to building and testing applications and the underlying cloud infrastructure. This includes using standard programming languages, applying software principles such as reusability and abstractions and testing, and leveraging the rich ecosystem of software development tools.

Without further ado, let’s take a look at each of the talks I’ve selected for you!

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