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Posts Tagged Containers

Running Container Images in AWS Lambda

Running Container Images in AWS Lambda

When AWS Lambda launched in 2014, it pioneered the concept of Function-as-a-Service. Developers could write a function in one of the supported programming languages, upload it to AWS, and Lambda executes the function on every invocation.

Ever since then, a zip archive of application code or binaries has been the only supported deployment option. Even AWS Lambda Layers—reusable components automatically merged into the application code—used the zip packaging format.

Today, AWS announced that AWS Lambda now supports packaging serverless functions as container images. This means that you can deploy a custom Docker or OCI image as an AWS Lambda function.

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Pulumi container images now available on Amazon ECR Public

Pulumi container images now available on Amazon ECR Public

At re:Invent, the AWS team unveiled the new Amazon Elastic Container Registry Public (Amazon ECR Public), creating a new option for users in publishing and pulling public container images. Pulumi fully supports Amazon ECR Public in two ways:

  1. Official Pulumi container images are available today on Amazon ECR Public.
  2. Pulumi is the easiest way to package and publish your container images, and we’ll support publishing your container images to Amazon ECR Public very soon.

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Deploy Kubernetes and Applications with Go

Deploy Kubernetes and Applications with Go

We’re excited that Go is now a first-class language in Pulumi and that you can build your infrastructure with Go on AWS, Azure, GCP, and many other clouds. Users often ask, “Can I use Pulumi to manage Kubernetes infrastructure in Go today?” With the release of Pulumi 2.0., the answer is “Yes!”

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Google Cloud Run: Serverless Containers

Google Cloud Run: Serverless Containers

Google Cloud Run is the latest addition to the serverless compute family. While it may look similar to existing services of public cloud, the feature set makes Cloud Run unique: Docker as a deployment package enables using any language, runtime, framework, or library that can respond to an HTTP request. Automatic scaling, including scale to zero, means you pay for what you consume with no fixed cost and no management overhead.

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Run Your Own RSS Server on AWS with Pulumi

Run Your Own RSS Server on AWS with Pulumi

It’s been a few years since Google shut down Google Reader, and while a number of nice commercial alternatives have sprung in its wake, none of them has ever been quite the right fit for me personally.

So a while back, after far too much time spent wandering the blogsphere manually, typing URLs into address bars by hand, I decided to go looking to see whether the universe had produced an open-source solution to this problem — and to my surprise and delight, it had! Miniflux is an excellent little open-source RSS server and reader, written in Go and backed by PostgreSQL, that also happens to be packaged as a Docker container. So in this post, I’ll show how easy it is to deploy a Miniflux server of your own on AWS, using only Pulumi and a few lines of TypeScript.

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ECS vs Fargate vs EKS: The Lowdown on Containers in AWS

ECS vs Fargate vs EKS: The Lowdown on Containers in AWS


Amazon offers multiple solutions for running containers in AWS, through its managed Elastic Container Service (ECS). This includes three major approaches: ECS managed automatically with Fargate, ECS backed by EC2 instances, and Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS), delivering the full power of Kubernetes. It’s not always easy to choose between these, so in this article we provide some basic guidance on the tradeoffs you’ll encounter when choosing.

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Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Introducing Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS: The Easiest Way to AWS

Amazon Web Services provides an incredible platform for developers to build cloud-native applications, and is used by millions of customers of all sizes. The building block services that AWS offers enable teams to offload undifferentiated heavy-lifting to AWS. To maximally benefit from these services though, cloud engineering teams must learn how to compose all of these building blocks together to build and deliver their own applications. Today, this is still too hard. Getting from your laptop to a production-ready AWS deployment frequently takes days or weeks instead of minutes or hours. And AWS building block services frequently leave you to re-implement (and re-discover) best-practices instead of providing these as smart defaults.

Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS is a new open source library of infrastructure-as-code components that make it easier to get from zero to production on AWS, easier to adopt AWS best practices by default, and easier to evolve your AWS infrastructure as your application needs mature.

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Pulumi and Docker: Development to Production

Here at Pulumi, we’re big fans of Docker: at this point there is little doubt that Docker has completely revolutionized the way that we think about deploying software. However, even in 2019, it’s quite difficult to get Docker containers to production. docker run is great, and we all love it, but unfortunately it’s quite a big leap from docker run to running your container in a production-ready environment.

We recently wrote a blog post about using AWS Fargate to run your docker containers with our open source packages. In this blog post we’re going to focus on another interesting aspect of Pulumi: being able to re-use your infrastructure code for both development and production!

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Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

Update: Check out the Learning Machine Case Study where provisioning went from 3 weeks to 1 hour with Pulumi and AWS.

“The impact of serverless capabilities was also transformative for the Learning Machine business. Pulumi enabled a rapid shift to Amazon ECS, AWS Fargate and AWS Lambda — the net effect of which was a 67% reduction in AWS charges. This enabled the team to spend less time focused on maintaining existing infrastructure and more time deploying new applications on AWS and adding new customers.

Pulumi is the foundational technology that allowed us to transform our organization,” said Hughes. The entire DevOps process was streamlined and in addition to realizing better productivity and higher quality, the team has new insight into their SaaS offering that they never thought possible.”

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