Posts Tagged docker

Cloud Systems Part Three: Deploying to Amazon ECS

Cloud engineering is taking over software development. In a lot of ways, this is great; it allows us to build and deploy more complicated applications with less difficulty, and maintaining those applications becomes less troublesome too. We can release smaller updates more quickly than ever, ensuring that we can stay on top of feature requests and security issues. That said, the rise of cloud engineering has also introduced a lot of complexity in the form of dozens of services even within just one cloud provider. Figuring out where to start can be tough, so let’s take a practical tour! In this series, I’ll walk you through building a personal website and deploying it using modern cloud engineering practices.

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Cloud Systems Part Two: Containerizing a Website

Cloud Systems Part Two: Containerizing a Website

Cloud engineering is taking over software development. In a lot of ways, this is great; it allows us to build and deploy more complicated applications with less difficulty, and maintaining those applications becomes less troublesome too. We can release smaller updates more quickly than ever, ensuring that we can stay on top of feature requests and security issues. That said, the rise of cloud engineering has also introduced a lot of complexity in the form of dozens of services even within just one cloud provider. Figuring out where to start can be tough, so let’s take a practical tour! In this series, I’ll walk you through building a personal website and deploying it using modern cloud engineering practices.

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How to Build a Container Registry

How to Build a Container Registry

Whether you are working with Kubernetes or serverless, your application uses containers. If you use the Docker desktop client, images are pushed to Docker Hub by default. Pulling images from Docker Hub is convenient, but there are many reasons to store images in your own registry. For example, Docker Hub doesn’t guarantee to produce the same image on repeated pulls, i.e., your base image might have changed. It’s also possible to inadvertently expose secrets in an intermediate image used to build the image stored on Docker Hub. There is also the possibility of vulnerabilities in even official images. This article shows how to create a repository and how to build and push images to that repository

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Build and publish container images to any cloud with Infrastructure as Code

Build and publish container images to any cloud with Infrastructure as Code

Going from a containerized application to a service running in the cloud requires a few steps beyond an application’s normal build-and-test cycle. Namely, it means building and publishing a container image in a registry and then consuming that image from your target environment, whether that’s Kubernetes, Amazon ECS, or another container orchestrator. It’s not enough to just write a Dockerfile — you will need to pick a container registry, decide whether that registry should be public or private, authenticate against it, and ideally automate deploying subsequent updates. Infrastructure as code to the rescue! In this article, we’ll see how to build, publish, and consume a simple container image across any cloud, using just a few lines of code.

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Migrating a cloud application to Kubernetes

Migrating a cloud application to Kubernetes

In this blog post, we will explore and demonstrate the advantages of Kubernetes by converting and deploying our PERN application to Amazon EKS. With the help of Pulumi, the process becomes greatly simplified and allows us to focus more on the big picture of designing our cloud architecture.

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Deploying a PERN stack application to AWS

Deploying a PERN stack application to AWS

In this blog post, we will explore PERN stack applications and deploy one to AWS. PERN is an acronym for PostgreSQL, Express, React, and Node. A PERN stack application is a project that uses PostgreSQL, Express as an application framework, React as a user interface framework, and runs on Node. We will also use Pulumi Crosswalk to reduce the amount of code and provide a quick and straightforward path for deploying the application.

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Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

One of the major advantages of using containers for development is reducing the need to install software and associated dependencies. Developers can start writing code without configuring a development environment that emulates production. The Visual Studio Code Remote - Containers extension lets you develop inside a container. If you want to use Pulumi’s infrastructure as code engine without installing the Pulumi CLI, this blog post is for you!

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