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Nishi Davidson

Nishi Davidson

Persisting Kubernetes workloads with Amazon EFS CSI volumes

Persisting Kubernetes workloads with Amazon EFS CSI volumes

Some parts of this blog post are out-of-date. As an alternative, please refer to the EFS CSI Helm Chart and Pulumi’s support for deploying helm charts The Amazon Elastic File System Container Storage Interface (CSI) Driver implements the CSI specification for container orchestrators to manage the lifecycle of Amazon EFS filesystems. The CSI specification defines an interface along with the minimum operational and packaging recommendations for a storage provider to implement a CSI compatible plugin.

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Kubernetes Ingress with AWS ALB Ingress Controller

Kubernetes Ingress with AWS ALB Ingress Controller

Kubernetes Ingress is an API object that allows you manage external (or) internal HTTP[s] access to Kubernetes services running in a cluster. Amazon Elastic Load Balancing Application Load Balancer (ALB) is a popular AWS service that load balances incoming traffic at the application layer across multiple targets, such as Amazon EC2 instances, in a region. ALB supports multiple features including host or path based routing, TLS (Transport layer security) termination, WebSockets, HTTP/2, AWS WAF (web application firewall) integration, integrated access logs, and health checks.

The AWS ALB Ingress controller is a Kubernetes SIG-AWS subproject - it was the second sub-project added to SIG-AWS after the aws-authenticator subproject. The ALB Ingress controller triggers the creation of an ALB and the necessary supporting AWS resources whenever a Kubernetes user declares an Ingress resource on the cluster. TargetGroups are created for each backend specified in the Ingress resource. Listeners are created for every port specified as Ingress resource annotation. When no port is specified, sensible defaults (80 or 443) are used. Rules are created for each path specified in your ingress resource. This ensures that traffic to a specific path is routed to the correct TargetGroup.

In this post, we will work through a simple example of running ALB based Kubernetes Ingresses with Pulumi EKS, AWS, and AWSX packages.

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Create Secure Jupyter Notebooks on Kubernetes using Pulumi

Create Secure Jupyter Notebooks on Kubernetes using Pulumi

In this post, we will work through an example that shows how to use Pulumi to create Jupyter Notebooks on Kubernetes. Having worked on Kubernetes since 2015, a couple of critical benefits jump out that may resonate with you as well:

  • You write everything in code - TypeScript in our example here.
  • You need not initialize Tiller or Helm to work with existing Helm charts like nginx-ingress-controller that we use here.
  • The security patterns in Helm and Tiller are no longer concerns, rather you get to focus on the RBAC of the actual service which is Jupyter-notebook in this example.
  • You accomplish more with less YAML and iteratively work towards your use cases.

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Continuous Delivery with GitLab and Pulumi on Amazon EKS

Continuous Delivery with GitLab and Pulumi on Amazon EKS

In this blog, we will work through an example that shows how to use Pulumi to enable GitLab-based continuous delivery with your Kubernetes workloads on Amazon EKS. This integration will work just as seamlessly for any Kubernetes cluster, including Azure AKS or Google GKE, using the relevant Pulumi libraries for Azure and GCP.

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Create AKS Clusters with Monitoring and Logging

Create AKS Clusters with Monitoring and Logging

Pulumi-Azure open source package can be used to create Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) clusters with AD service principals tied to the cluster. Monitoring and logging can also be enabled by default in simple steps with Pulumi for core AKS components. This article will show you how to write this as a simple example using Pulumi SDKs.

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Kubernetes RBAC in AWS EKS with open source Pulumi packages

One of the most common areas Kubernetes operators struggle with in production involves creating and managing role-based access control (RBAC). This is so daunting that RBAC is often not implemented, or implemented halfway, or the configuration becomes impossible to maintain.

Fortunately, Pulumi makes RBAC on Kuberenetes so easy that you’ll never create an insecure cluster again. In this post, we will contrast the traditional way of working with RBAC on EKS with using Pulumi.

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