Pulumi now supports Atlassian Identity

Praneet Loke Praneet Loke
Pulumi now supports Atlassian Identity

Today we added support for yet another developer favorite product, Atlassian Bitbucket. You can now sign-up for a Pulumi account with an Atlassian identity. This also means you can connect your Atlassian identity with an existing Pulumi account.

This work follows on from the support for GitLab identity and also the ability to connect identities, eliminating the need for users to create multiple accounts on Pulumi.

This helps users with repos across the major version control systems to seamlessly import their GitHub Organizations and GitLab Groups - and now Atlassian Bitbucket Teams - into a single Pulumi account. Of course, you don’t need to connect identities. You can always create separate account for each of your identities, if that’s what you want to do.

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Getting to ChatOps with Pulumi Webhooks

Chris Smith Chris Smith
Getting to ChatOps with Pulumi Webhooks

Today we are delighted to announce the availability of Webhooks on Pulumi. Webhooks are a very common mechanism to enable teams to be notified or react to events. In Pulumi’s case, this means: notifications of infrastructure changes (be it on Kubernetes, AWS, or any other cloud); responding to those changes as part of ‘ChatOps’; or other build pipelines, to improve the delivery of cloud native infrastructure.

Pulumi Webhooks are available for the Team and Enterprise editions of Pulumi. If you’re keen to try them out, start a trial of Team Edition here.

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Serverless on AWS with Pulumi: Simple, Event-based Functions

Cyrus Najmabadi Cyrus Najmabadi

One of Pulumi’s goals is to provide the simplest way possible to do serverless programming on AWS by enabling you to create cloud infrastructure with familiar programming languages that you are already using today. We believe that the existing constructs already present in these languages, like flow control, inheritance, composition, and so on, provide the right abstractions to effectively build up infrastructure in a simple and familiar way.

In a previous post we focused on how Pulumi could allow you to simply create an AWS Lambda out of your own JavaScript function. While this was much easier than having to manually create a Lambda Deployment Package yourself, it could still be overly complex to integrate these Lambdas into complete serverless application.

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2018 Year at a Glance

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy

As we close out 2018, and enter into a New Year, I was reflecting on our progress here at Pulumi this past year and wanted to share some thoughts. It’s been an incredible year and we are hugely thankful to our passionate community, customers, and partners.

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Connecting multiple identities to Pulumi

Praneet Loke Praneet Loke
Connecting multiple identities to Pulumi

Hot on the heels of our GitLab sign-in support, we’ve just released support for multiple identities for a single Pulumi account in the Pulumi Service. Previously, you could only sign-up for a new Pulumi account using a GitHub or GitLab identity. Starting today, you can connect your Pulumi account with additional identities, beyond what you first signed-up with.

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Delivering Cloud Native Infrastructure as Code

Marc Holmes Marc Holmes
Delivering Cloud Native Infrastructure as Code

Enterprise software has undergone a slow shift from containerless servers to serverless containers. The evolution of the cloud, combined with the shift to increasingly ephemeral infrastructure, and the connection of application code and infrastructure code, demands a different view of cloud development and devops. To a first approximation, all developers are cloud developers, all applications are cloud native, and all operations are cloud-first. Yet, there is a lack of a consistent approach to delivering cloud native applications and infrastructure.

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Epsagon: Define, Deploy and Monitor Serverless Applications

Luke Hoban Luke Hoban
Epsagon: Define, Deploy and Monitor Serverless Applications

Pulumi makes it incredibly easy to use serverless functions within your cloud infrastructure and applications - an AWS Lambda is as simple as writing a JavaScript lambda!

const bucket = new aws.s3.Bucket("my-bucket");
bucket.onObjectCreated("onNewObject", async (ev) => console.log(ev));

By making it so easy to introduce serverless functions into cloud infrastructure, Pulumi programs often incorporate many Lambdas, all wired together as part of a larger set of infrastructure and application code.

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Meet the Pulumi team at AWS re:Invent

Marc Holmes Marc Holmes

Heading to AWS re:Invent? Concerned about how you’ll manage to get that much YAML into your carry on bag? Or maybe you just like purple.

Whatever the reason, the Pulumi team will be there all week at **Booth 316, Startup Central, Aria Quad, **and we’d love to chat with you about AWS and Pulumi.

Catch up with us on serverless functions, containers and Kubernetes, managed services and any other cloud native infrastructure as code, and see how you can more productively manage your AWS cloud resources with general purpose programming languages. We can even help you migrate your CloudFormation to Pulumi.

If you want to grab a specific time to talk through your needs, then use this link, otherwise we’ll just see you at the booth!

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