Supporting Kubernetes with Faster, Easier Test Environments

Scott Lowe Scott Lowe
Supporting Kubernetes with Faster, Easier Test Environments

Scott Lowe is a 20+ year veteran of the IT industry and a Staff Kubernetes Architect at VMWare. He’s a prolific author (seven books) and blogger. His technology-focused blog covers a range of topics that include cloud computing (AWS, Azure, and Kubernetes), virtualization (KVM, VMware vSphere), open-source tools (Terraform, Ansible, Vagrant, and others), and networking (Open vSwitch, Linux networking).

For this guest post, Scott demonstrates how he uses Pulumi to deploy AWS test environments across multiple regions to help with testing various Kubernetes tools and projects, including the Cluster API project.

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Architecture as Code: Serverless

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Architecture as Code: Serverless

In this fourth installment of Architecture as Code series, we’ll take a look at serverless, an architectural pattern that has quickly gained popularity among cloud practitioners. There are two reasons why serverless usage has proliferated: a cost-saving pay as you go model and elasticity that goes from zero to as many as needed to complete the task without managing servers.

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Announcing Pulumi 2.0, Now with Superpowers

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Announcing Pulumi 2.0, Now with Superpowers

Today we are excited to announce Pulumi 2.0, the next major stage in our journey as an open source project, company, and community. This release expands on our original vision of using your favorite languages and tools to do all things infrastructure as code, now with new cloud engineering superpowers that will help you and your team adopt modern cloud architectures.

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Deploy Kubernetes and Applications with Go

Levi Blackstone Levi Blackstone
Deploy Kubernetes and Applications with Go

We’re excited that Go is now a first-class language in Pulumi and that you can build your infrastructure with Go on AWS, Azure, GCP, and many other clouds. Users often ask, “Can I use Pulumi to manage Kubernetes infrastructure in Go today?” With the release of Pulumi 2.0., the answer is “Yes!”

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Architecture as Code: Microservices

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Architecture as Code: Microservices

This article is the third in a series about Architecture as Code. The first article provided an overview of virtual machines, microservices, serverless, and Kubernetes. The second one went in-depth on deploying virtual machines as reusable components. In this third installment, we’ll look at microservices and how to implement them as reusable components with Pulumi.

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Automatically Enforcing AWS Resource Tagging Policies

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Automatically Enforcing AWS Resource Tagging Policies

AWS publishes best practices for how to tag your resources for cost tracking, automation, and organization. But how do you enforce that you’re doing it correctly across all of your projects? And is it really necessary to manually track down all those places where you missed a tag and manually patch things up? In this article, we’ll see how to use Policy as Code to enforce your team’s tagging strategies in addition to some powerful Infrastructure as Code techniques to automate applying your tags in a consistent way across all of your projects and resources.

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Resource Oriented Documentation

Luke Hoban Luke Hoban
Resource Oriented Documentation

Documentation in any product is super important, and an area where folks have shared a lot of feedback! We’ve heard you, and this week we took a major step in rolling out a brand new approach to resource documentation. We hope you like it as much as we do.

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Life of a Pulumi Intern

Tasia Halim Tasia Halim
Life of a Pulumi Intern

👋I’m Tasia, a Computer Science student at the University of Washington and Pulumi’s very first intern. Read on to learn about some of my thoughts and experiences from these past few months! Why Pulumi? I’ve interned at a few different companies before, but for my last internship, there were several things I was looking for: A start-up. All the companies I worked at previously had at least a couple thousand people, and I wanted to see first-hand the difference in both engineering and culture between larger, more established companies and smaller, newer ones.

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