Sophia Parafina

Sophia Parafina

Technical Marketing Manager

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Day 2

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Day 2

Your application made it out of the dev stage, passed the testing stage, and arrived in production. As a developer, you might think that it’s an ops problem now. However, DevOps is a collaborative effort between developers and operators to build and maintain applications using shared techniques and processes, often called “Day 2” activities.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

In previous installments, we examined how to deploy applications. However, we only touched on how applications talk to each other inside and outside the cluster. Whether you are building a modern application or modernizing a legacy application, understanding how resources and components talk to each other is essential. In this installment, we’ll examine networking in Kubernetes.

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Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

This article is the fourth in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. This series walks you through:

In the previous post, we examined different methods for deploying applications. We worked through examples of a boilerplate deployment, to one using ComponentResources to automate deployment further, and deploying with Helm charts. In this installment, we’ll look at how to deploy stateful applications, such as databases, in Kubernetes. Unlike stateless applications, stateful apps require persistent storage, which presents scaling and availability challenges.

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Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

One of the major advantages of using containers for development is reducing the need to install software and associated dependencies. Developers can start writing code without configuring a development environment that emulates production. The Visual Studio Code Remote - Containers extension lets you develop inside a container. If you want to use Pulumi’s infrastructure as code engine without installing the Pulumi CLI, this blog post is for you!

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Welcome to the third article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. In the previous post, we reviewed basic Kubernetes objects and abstractions used when deploying an application. We examined code examples across the cloud providers to show how to use infrastructure as code to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects. In this installment, we’ll progress from a simple deployment with just a single application container to a complex application with multiple containers and Pods.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Welcome to the second article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. The series walks you through building a Kubernetes cluster on cloud providers, deploying applications, and “Day 2” activities such as migrating Node groups. In the previous article, we showed how to create a Kubernetes cluster for AWS, Azure, and GCP. In this installment, we’ll learn how to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Containers solved the problem of moving software from one environment to another because they encapsulate all the software dependencies. However, an orchestration platform is needed to manage containers at scale. Kubernetes is a popular open-source solution that uses declarative configuration to specify the desired state of the application. Configuring and deploying an application on Kubernetes is often accomplished with YAML files to define the state and command line tools to manage and control the Kubernetes API. This article demonstrates how to use infrastructure as code to create basic Kubernetes objects and higher-level abstractions that build upon the basic objects.

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Policy as Code with Python

Policy as Code with Python

Policy as Code for Python is now GA in Pulumi 2.0. Policies written in code let you test, automate deployment, and enable version control. Python is a popular scripting language used for machine learning and artificial intelligence, data science, web development, and devops. It’s an ideal language for developers and operators to use in common.

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Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

A Jamstack is a modern architecture for building websites; JAM stands for JavaScript, APIs, and Markup. Jamstacks are deployed on a CDN, and content is stored on a cloud services provider. In addition to the speed and simplicity of deploying static content served from a CDN, there are other advantages such as maintaining content with git, modern build tools to generate the static content, automated builds, atomic deploys, and instant cache validation.

While build tools have simplified the process of creating content ready for deployment on a CDN, creating the infrastructure to serve the content remains complicated. You can use a cloud provider’s web interface or script the build using a CLI tool if you want to manage your infrastructure instead of using a hosted solution. The alternative is to use infrastructure as code tool to automate building and deploying cloud resources. This article demonstrates how to create a jamstack website and deploy it on AWS using Pulumi.

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Winning with Pulumi Superpowers and Kubernetes

Winning with Pulumi Superpowers and Kubernetes

You’ve containerized your application, and it’s running great on your desktop using Docker Compose or Swarm. But now it’s time to test it locally with minikube and then put it into production with Kubernetes. Manifests are a bit like Compose files - it’s just YAML, right?

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