Sophia Parafina

Sophia Parafina

Technical Marketing Manager

Architecture as Code: Microservices

Architecture as Code: Microservices

This article is the third in a series about Architecture as Code. The first article provided an overview of virtual machines, microservices, serverless, and Kubernetes. The second one went in-depth on deploying virtual machines as reusable components. In this third installment, we’ll look at microservices and how to implement them as reusable components with Pulumi.

Read more →

Managing AWS Credentials on CI/CD - Part 2

Managing AWS Credentials on CI/CD - Part 2

This article is the second part of a series on best practices for securely managing AWS credentials on CI/CD. In this article, we go in-depth on providing AWS credentials securely to a 3rd party and introduce a Pulumi program to automate rotating access keys.

Read more →

Unit Testing Infrastructure

Unit Testing Infrastructure

We’re pleased to announce that unit testing with Node.js, Python, .NET, and Go is supported in recent releases. You can test resources before deploying your infrastructure using familiar tools and test frameworks. Check your resource configuration and responses without the wait of deploying them and speed up infrastructure development and production deployments.

Read more →

Architecture as Code

Architecture as Code

Abstraction is key to building resilient systems because it encapsulates behavior and decouples code, letting each component perform its function independently. The same principles apply to infrastructure, where we want to declare behavior or state and not implementation details. As an industry, we’ve moved away from monolithic applications to distributed systems such as serverless, microservices, Kubernetes, and virtual machine deployments. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the characteristics of these architectures and how Pulumi can abstract the components that comprise these systems.

Read more →

Managing AWS Credentials on CI/CD

Managing AWS Credentials on CI/CD

Continuous delivery requires providing highly sensitive credentials to your deployment pipeline. Understanding the risks, mitigations, and best practices for handling those credentials can be difficult. In this guide, we describe the best practices for providing AWS credentials to a CI/CD system and to securely automate updating your cloud infrastructure using Pulumi.

Read more →

Manage Any Infrastructure with Policy as Code

Manage Any Infrastructure with Policy as Code

In an earlier article, we introduced examples of Policy as Code to prevent two of the most common causes of data breaches. Policies are the guardrails of infrastructure. They control access, set limits, and manage how infrastructure operates. In many systems, policies are created by clicking on a GUI, making it difficult to replicate or version. Pulumi implements policy by writing it in Typescript, which ensures that you can write policies using software development practices such as automated testing, deployment, and version control.

Read more →

Intro to AWS Serverless Step Functions

Intro to AWS Serverless Step Functions

AWS Step Functions lets you build applications by connecting AWS services. Daisy-chaining steps into a workflow simplifies application development by creating a state machine diagram which shows how services are connected to each other in your application. We’ll go into the details of creating a lambda function, IAM roles and policies, and creating a workflow. Once we have the example deployed, we’ll walk through the process of adding another function and step to the workflow. Included in the walkthrough is a discussion of one of the aspects of the Pulumi programming model. The goal of this article is to provide a foundation for building your application using serverless workflows.

Read more →

Getting Started With PaC

Getting Started With PaC

Modern applications have brought many benefits and improvements, including the ability to scale and rapid iterations to update software. However, this has come at the cost of complexity. Modern infrastructure is composed of many resources that require detailed configuration to work correctly and securely. Even managed solutions from cloud service providers need additional configuration to ensure that services are secure and free of defects. Cloud providers, such as AWS, do allow you to create policies to ensure that applications are secure, but they are specific to resources that are already deployed. A significant benefit of Policy as Code is the ability to verify and spot problems before deploying your infrastructure.

Read more →