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Sophia Parafina

Sophia Parafina

Technical Marketing Manager

Deploying Minecraft on Azure

Deploying Minecraft on Azure

This article demonstrates how to deploy and provision a virtual machine in Azure using the Pulumi Next Generation Azure provider. While there are numerous examples of using the Azure console, the Azure CLI, or ARM templates to deploy and provision virtual machines, we’ll use Python to implement a repeatable deployment.

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Policy as Code for Any Cloud Provider

Policy as Code for Any Cloud Provider

Policies protect your infrastructure by controlling access, set limits that reduce the blast radius of an incident, and manage infrastructure operations. Policies are commonly created through a form on a cloud provider’s administrative console, making replicating or versioning the policy more difficult. With Policy as Code, you can apply software engineering practices such as automated testing, deployment, and version control when creating policies.

CrossGuard is Pulumi’s Policy as Code solution that lets you create, verify, apply, and enforce policies. Policies are standalone packages that can be run against any Pulumi stack. That means your policies are language agnostic and work with any language supported by Pulumi. Policy Packages are policy bundles that evaluate every resource in your stack, whether deployed in AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, or Kubernetes.

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Cloud Engineering Summit Reloaded

Cloud Engineering Summit Reloaded

Putting on a new event is always risky, especially when the calendar is saturated with virtual conferences. Our goal for the Cloud Engineering Summit was to bring the level of conversation above specific technologies and take a holistic look into the future of the cloud and you knocked it out of the park! Here are the stats:

  • 46 industry leaders
  • 17 hours of content
  • 3000+ participants
  • 96 countries

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Avoiding Kubernetes Anti-Patterns

Avoiding Kubernetes Anti-Patterns

In software development, an anti-pattern is defined as an apparent solution that has unintended or negative consequences. The other side of anti-patterns is that they also offer solutions. Let’s look at container and Kubernetes anti-patterns and how to avoid them with infrastructure as code.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Day 2

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Day 2

Your application made it out of the dev stage, passed the testing stage, and arrived in production. As a developer, you might think that it’s an ops problem now. However, DevOps is a collaborative effort between developers and operators to build and maintain applications using shared techniques and processes, often called “Day 2” activities.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

In previous installments, we examined how to deploy applications. However, we only touched on how applications talk to each other inside and outside the cluster. Whether you are building a modern application or modernizing a legacy application, understanding how resources and components talk to each other is essential. In this installment, we’ll examine networking in Kubernetes.

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Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

This article is the fourth in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. This series walks you through:

In the previous post, we examined different methods for deploying applications. We worked through examples of a boilerplate deployment, to one using ComponentResources to automate deployment further, and deploying with Helm charts. In this installment, we’ll look at how to deploy stateful applications, such as databases, in Kubernetes. Unlike stateless applications, stateful apps require persistent storage, which presents scaling and availability challenges.

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Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

One of the major advantages of using containers for development is reducing the need to install software and associated dependencies. Developers can start writing code without configuring a development environment that emulates production. The Visual Studio Code Remote - Containers extension lets you develop inside a container. If you want to use Pulumi’s infrastructure as code engine without installing the Pulumi CLI, this blog post is for you!

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Welcome to the third article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. In the previous post, we reviewed basic Kubernetes objects and abstractions used when deploying an application. We examined code examples across the cloud providers to show how to use infrastructure as code to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects. In this installment, we’ll progress from a simple deployment with just a single application container to a complex application with multiple containers and Pods.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Welcome to the second article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. The series walks you through building a Kubernetes cluster on cloud providers, deploying applications, and “Day 2” activities such as migrating Node groups. In the previous article, we showed how to create a Kubernetes cluster for AWS, Azure, and GCP. In this installment, we’ll learn how to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects.

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