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Sophia Parafina

Sophia Parafina

Technical Marketing Manager

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Containers solved the problem of moving software from one environment to another because they encapsulate all the software dependencies. However, an orchestration platform is needed to manage containers at scale. Kubernetes is a popular open-source solution that uses declarative configuration to specify the desired state of the application. Configuring and deploying an application on Kubernetes is often accomplished with YAML files to define the state and command line tools to manage and control the Kubernetes API. This article demonstrates how to use infrastructure as code to create basic Kubernetes objects and higher-level abstractions that build upon the basic objects.

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Policy as Code with Python

Policy as Code with Python

Policy as Code for Python is now GA in Pulumi 2.0. Policies written in code let you test, automate deployment, and enable version control. Python is a popular scripting language used for machine learning and artificial intelligence, data science, web development, and devops. It’s an ideal language for developers and operators to use in common.

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Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

A Jamstack is a modern architecture for building websites; JAM stands for JavaScript, APIs, and Markup. Jamstacks are deployed on a CDN, and content is stored on a cloud services provider. In addition to the speed and simplicity of deploying static content served from a CDN, there are other advantages such as maintaining content with git, modern build tools to generate the static content, automated builds, atomic deploys, and instant cache validation.

While build tools have simplified the process of creating content ready for deployment on a CDN, creating the infrastructure to serve the content remains complicated. You can use a cloud provider’s web interface or script the build using a CLI tool if you want to manage your infrastructure instead of using a hosted solution. The alternative is to use infrastructure as code tool to automate building and deploying cloud resources. This article demonstrates how to create a jamstack website and deploy it on AWS using Pulumi.

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Winning with Pulumi Superpowers and Kubernetes

Winning with Pulumi Superpowers and Kubernetes

You’ve containerized your application, and it’s running great on your desktop using Docker Compose or Swarm. But now it’s time to test it locally with minikube and then put it into production with Kubernetes. Manifests are a bit like Compose files - it’s just YAML, right?

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Benefits of Policy as Code

Benefits of Policy as Code

Writing infrastructure policy in a high-level programming language helps automate and enforce best practices. When policies are written with code, you can apply software development practices such as testing, automated deployment, and version control. Cloud providers typically offer a GUI to create policies, but creating policies is not easily repeatable, nor can you version policies. Moreover, policies must be tested against a live system, which means using an existing system or configuring and deploying an ephemeral version.

While the benefits of writing policies as code are evident for developers and operators, the organizational benefits are even more significant. Organizations can realize cost savings, improved compliance, efficient deployments, fine-grained control over infrastructure, and better use of cloud provider native resources. Let’s take a look at these benefits in-depth.

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Managing AWS Credentials on CI/CD - Part 3

Managing AWS Credentials on CI/CD - Part 3

This article is the third part of a series on best practices for securely managing AWS credentials on CI/CD. In this article, we cover the last leg of the continuous delivery process to update your AWS resources and how to store sensitive data using Pulumi securely.

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Architecture as Code: Kubernetes

Architecture as Code: Kubernetes

This is the fifth and last installment of the Architecture as Code series. In previous articles, we examined how to create reusable components for the primary architectural patterns for cloud infrastructure. Starting with virtual machines, we examined how to create and configure VMs. In the follow-up article, we demonstrated how to create reusable components from resources that comprise a microservices architecture. After microservices, we looked at serverless architecture, which despite its name, also requires additional resources to deploy a function or application. In this article, we’ll look at deployment patterns for Kubernetes with a focus on multi-tenancy issues.

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Architecture as Code: Serverless

Architecture as Code: Serverless

In this fourth installment of Architecture as Code series, we’ll take a look at serverless, an architectural pattern that has quickly gained popularity among cloud practitioners. There are two reasons why serverless usage has proliferated: a cost-saving pay as you go model and elasticity that goes from zero to as many as needed to complete the task without managing servers.

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Architecture as Code: Microservices

Architecture as Code: Microservices

This article is the third in a series about Architecture as Code. The first article provided an overview of virtual machines, microservices, serverless, and Kubernetes. The second one went in-depth on deploying virtual machines as reusable components. In this third installment, we’ll look at microservices and how to implement them as reusable components with Pulumi.

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