Fraser Waters

Fraser Waters

Software Engineer

Easier IaC adoption with improved `pulumi import` experience

Easier IaC adoption with improved `pulumi import` experience

Last year, we introduced a new Pulumi feature that allows you to import existing infrastructure into your Pulumi program. Not only did it bring the resource into the Pulumi state file, but it could generate the source code for your Pulumi program too. Today, we’re excited to announce that we’ve listened to feedback and delivered a plethora of updates and fixes to streamline the import experience; to make it more useful, more convenient, and more powerful.

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Retain on Delete

Retain on Delete

Pulumi is frequently used to manage the entire lifecycle of a resource, from creation, to updates, to replacement, to deletion. However, there are some cases where it is important to ensure that a resource’s life can extend beyond the lifetime of the Pulumi program that created it. To support these use cases, Pulumi now supports a new resource option RetainOnDelete which allows a resource to be retained in a cloud provider even after it is deleted from the Pulumi stack it is part of.

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Announcing the public preview of Update Plans

Announcing the public preview of Update Plans

Pulumi’s previews are an important part of any workflow where you want to see the changes that will be made to your infrastructure before actually making the changes (with pulumi up). However, today there is no guarantee that the pulumi up operation will do only what was previewed; if the program, or your infrastructure, changes between the preview and the update, the update might make additional changes to bring your infrastructure back in line with what’s defined in your program. We’ve heard from many of you that you need a strong guarantee about exactly which changes an update will make to your infrastructure, especially in critical and production environments.

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Exploring how to solve circular dependencies

Exploring how to solve circular dependencies

As part of our hackathon near the end of last year, we decided to explore solutions to a common problem when people are using Pulumi for their systems. A question that’s been asked in a few different forms is how to resolve circular dependencies between resources in a Pulumi program. A simple example of this idea is a modern web application with a static front-end and an API, where the front-end needs to know the URL of the API to be able to call it and the API needs to know the source domain of the front-end to allow it access via CORS.

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