Joe Duffy

Joe Duffy

Co-Founder and CEO

A Year of Helping Customers Build Production-Ready Kubernetes Infrastructure

A Year of Helping Customers Build Production-Ready Kubernetes Infrastructure

Today we announced Pulumi Crosswalk for Kubernetes, a collection of open source tools, libraries, and playbooks to help developers and operators work together to bring Kubernetes into their organizations. They capture the lessons we learned this past year working with organizations to go from zero to Kubernetes in production for their infrastructure and application workloads. By releasing these as open source, we hope to help everybody be more successful with their Kubernetes projects — as we have learned through experience, it isn’t easy going!

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Pulumi 💜 .NET Core

Pulumi 💜 .NET Core

Today we are excited to announce the Preview of .NET Core support for all of your modern infrastructure as code needs. This means you can create, deploy, and manage your infrastructure, on any cloud, using your favorite .NET language, including C#, F#, and VB.NET.

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Manage DigitalOcean Kubernetes Clusters and Workloads using Infrastructure as Code

Manage DigitalOcean Kubernetes Clusters and Workloads using Infrastructure as Code

We recently partnered with DigitalOcean to publish a new tutorial, How to Manage DigitalOcean and Kubernetes Infrastructure with Pulumi. This short tutorial walks you through provisioning a new DigitalOcean Kubernetes cluster, deploying an application to it, and then assigninging a stable domain name to your application’s load balancer — all in a handful of lines of infrastructure as code. By using infrastructure as code to provision and update your infrastructure, it’s easy to create new environments, modify or scale existing ones, or automate your deployments using continuous delivery.

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Pulumi 1.0

Pulumi 1.0

Today we are excited to announce the general availability of Pulumi 1.0. Pulumi is a modern infrastructure as code tool that lets you declare infrastructure using real languages, with a SaaS management console for configuring identities, organizations, and related policies. By using real languages, developers and operators are able to work better together, sharing and reusing best practices, accomplishing new levels of automation, and unlocking access to ecosystems of existing tools.

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Unit Testing Your Infrastructure with Node.js and Mocha

Unit Testing Your Infrastructure with Node.js and Mocha

Testing your infrastructure using familiar tools like Node.js’s Mocha framework allows you to ensure configuration is correct before provisioning, and that the resulting infrastructure has certain desirable properties afterwards. This can enforce team standards, ensure security guidelines are being followed, and so much more. Because Pulumi uses general purpose languages, you can just embed tests alongside your infrastructure-as-code definitions themselves, using a familiar authoring style and reporting experience. In this post, we’ll explore the ins and outs of unit testing your infrastructure.

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Running Containers in AWS, the Lowdown: ECS, Fargate, and EKS

Running Containers in AWS, the Lowdown: ECS, Fargate, and EKS

Amazon offers multiple solutions for running containers in AWS, through its managed Elastic Container Service (ECS). This includes three major approaches: ECS managed automatically with Fargate, ECS backed by EC2 instances, and Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS), delivering the full power of Kubernetes. It’s not always easy to choose between these, so in this article we provide some basic guidance on the tradeoffs you’ll encounter when choosing.

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Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

The Docker Getting Started tutorial shows how to develop, build, and run a modern containerized application, from a single custom Docker container published to the Docker Hub, to a scaled out service with load balancing. But there are challenges: it requires you to program in YAML, run (or script) many CLI commands, and manage your own Swarm or Kubernetes cluster. There is an easier way. By using Pulumi’s infrastructure as code, we can build a custom Docker image, publish it to a private AWS container registry, and spin up an AWS Fargate load balanced service running that container, all in 28 lines of TypeScript code and a single pulumi up command. The result leverages the best of what AWS has to offer, with the entire platform at your fingertips, with a single approach. In this article, we’ll see how.

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Announcing Per User Pricing and Unlimited Stacks for Teams

Since launching last year, thousands of users and hundreds of companies, from startups to Fortune 500 Enterprises, have chosen Pulumi for cloud applications and infrastructure delivery across AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, and Kubernetes. Today we are announcing important changes to better align our product and pricing with how we’ve heard you want to use Pulumi in production. We’re optimistic that these changes will help companies of all sizes choose Pulumi, enabling their teams to deliver cloud applications and infrastructure faster and more reliably.

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Testing Your Infrastructure as Code with Pulumi

Testing Your Infrastructure as Code with Pulumi

Using Pulumi and general purpose languages for infrastructure as code comes with many benefits: leveraging existing skills and knowledge, eliminating boilerplate through abstraction, and using the same ecosystem of tools like IDEs and linters that your team already knows and loves. In general, these are all attributes of software engineering, which not only make us more productive, but also improve the quality of our code. It’s only natural, therefore, that using general purpose languages unlocks another important software engineering practice: testing.

In this article, we will see the many ways in which Pulumi lets us test our infrastructure as code.

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