The Automation API is now available. No CLI. No human-in-the-loop. Just your code. Learn More

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

In previous installments, we examined how to deploy applications. However, we only touched on how applications talk to each other inside and outside the cluster. Whether you are building a modern application or modernizing a legacy application, understanding how resources and components talk to each other is essential. In this installment, we’ll examine networking in Kubernetes.

Read more →

Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

This article is the fourth in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. This series walks you through:

In the previous post, we examined different methods for deploying applications. We worked through examples of a boilerplate deployment, to one using ComponentResources to automate deployment further, and deploying with Helm charts. In this installment, we’ll look at how to deploy stateful applications, such as databases, in Kubernetes. Unlike stateless applications, stateful apps require persistent storage, which presents scaling and availability challenges.

Read more →

Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Build a Pulumi VS Code Devcontainer Environment

One of the major advantages of using containers for development is reducing the need to install software and associated dependencies. Developers can start writing code without configuring a development environment that emulates production. The Visual Studio Code Remote - Containers extension lets you develop inside a container. If you want to use Pulumi’s infrastructure as code engine without installing the Pulumi CLI, this blog post is for you!

Read more →

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Welcome to the third article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. In the previous post, we reviewed basic Kubernetes objects and abstractions used when deploying an application. We examined code examples across the cloud providers to show how to use infrastructure as code to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects. In this installment, we’ll progress from a simple deployment with just a single application container to a complex application with multiple containers and Pods.

Read more →

Announcing Kustomize Support

Levi Blackstone Levi Blackstone
Announcing Kustomize Support

Kubernetes is complex, and there are many ways to manage Kubernetes resources. Pulumi supports many of these options, including native code SDKs, YAML, Helm, and now, Kustomize. There’s no need to rewrite your existing configurations to get started with Pulumi. You can efficiently adopt existing resources to deploy your modern application and save time and effort.

Read more →

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Welcome to the second article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. The series walks you through building a Kubernetes cluster on cloud providers, deploying applications, and “Day 2” activities such as migrating Node groups. In the previous article, we showed how to create a Kubernetes cluster for AWS, Azure, and GCP. In this installment, we’ll learn how to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects.

Read more →

Introducing New Slimmer Docker Images

Lee Briggs Lee Briggs
Introducing New Slimmer Docker Images

One of the most exciting aspects of using Pulumi can also present some interesting engineering challenges. Pulumi supports three operating systems, multiple programming languages, and almost 40 different providers. This means creating tooling that works effortlessly across all possible user scenarios can often throw unexpected challenges our way.

Nowhere are these challenges more prevalent than in the Pulumi Docker containers.

The pulumi/pulumi Docker container is almost 3Gb uncompressed, which is generally considered large for a Docker image. In this post, I’ll examine why this container has grown to the size that it is, and talk about how we hope to solve it.

Read more →

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Containers solved the problem of moving software from one environment to another because they encapsulate all the software dependencies. However, an orchestration platform is needed to manage containers at scale. Kubernetes is a popular open-source solution that uses declarative configuration to specify the desired state of the application. Configuring and deploying an application on Kubernetes is often accomplished with YAML files to define the state and command line tools to manage and control the Kubernetes API. This article demonstrates how to use infrastructure as code to create basic Kubernetes objects and higher-level abstractions that build upon the basic objects.

Read more →

Unlocking Spinnaker With Pulumi

Praneet Loke Praneet Loke
Unlocking Spinnaker With Pulumi

Spinnaker is an open source, multi-cloud continuous delivery platform for releasing software changes with high velocity and confidence. This makes it a perfect fit for Pulumi to unleash the power of Spinnaker and its continuous delivery capabilities to all of the providers that Pulumi supports today and in the future. We have written a developer guide showing you how to install the plugin in your Spinnaker instance and start using it right away.

Read more →