Level up your Azure Platform as a Service applications with Pulumi

Mikhail Shilkov Mikhail Shilkov
Level up your Azure Platform as a Service applications with Pulumi

Today’s guest post is from Mikhail Shilkov, a Microsoft Azure MVP and early Pulumi user and contributor - enjoy!

Today I want to guide you through the process of developing Pulumi programs to leverage Azure Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) services. My language of choice is TypeScript—a powerful and expressive typed language, which is very familiar to many Azure users.

Azure Platform as a Service

Azure consists of dozens of cloud services, from VMs to Kubernetes to Serverless. In my experience, a lot of customers choose Azure for its strong portfolio of PaaS-level services.

Azure App Service is a well-established managed compute offering to run web applications, RESTful APIs, or background workers. Azure SQL Database is a fully managed service to run relational databases with features like high availability and backups available out-of-the-box. Enriched by services like Azure DevOps for CI/CD and Application Insights for APM, PaaS is a powerful way to get the benefits of the cloud without the need to fully re-architect software solutions.

The power of relying on PaaS is evidenced by significant customer adoption. App Service is among the most popular compute services in Azure:

If you use automation (ARM, scripts, TF, …) to define and deploy Azure infrastructure, which services are your primary target? Vote & RT!

– Mikhail Shilkov (@MikhailShilkov) April 23, 2019

Nonetheless, PaaS services pose different challenges to application developers. In particular, the usage of multiple cloud services demands an investment in infrastructure automation. That’s where Pulumi comes to the rescue.

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CI/CD Made Easy with Pulumi and Azure Pipelines

Praneet Loke Praneet Loke
CI/CD Made Easy with Pulumi and Azure Pipelines

Azure DevOps is very popular among teams that want a single place to manage their development pipelines, Git repositories, builds, releases, and test plans. Pulumi’s open-source tools are a great choice for developers and operators deploying infrastructure as code on Azure. With these two tools at hand, adopting CI and CD for your Azure infrastructure is just a few steps away for you and your teams. To make it easy to use Pulumi with Azure, we are announcing an open-source task extension for Azure Pipelines!

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Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Get Started with Docker on AWS Fargate using Pulumi

The Docker Getting Started tutorial shows how to develop, build, and run a modern containerized application, from a single custom Docker container published to the Docker Hub, to a scaled out service with load balancing. But there are challenges: it requires you to program in YAML, run (or script) many CLI commands, and manage your own Swarm or Kubernetes cluster. There is an easier way. By using Pulumi’s infrastructure as code, we can build a custom Docker image, publish it to a private AWS container registry, and spin up an AWS Fargate load balanced service running that container, all in 28 lines of TypeScript code and a single pulumi up command. The result leverages the best of what AWS has to offer, with the entire platform at your fingertips, with a single approach. In this article, we’ll see how.

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Simplify Kubernetes RBAC in Amazon EKS with open source Pulumi packages

Nishi Davidson Nishi Davidson

One of the most common areas Kubernetes operators struggle with in production involves creating and managing role-based access control (RBAC). This is so daunting that RBAC is often not implemented, or implemented halfway, or the configuration becomes impossible to maintain. In this post, we will contrast the traditional way of working with RBAC on EKS with using Pulumi — Pulumi makes RBAC on Kubernetes so easy that you’ll never create an insecure cluster again!

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Protecting Your APIs with Lambda Authorizers and Pulumi

Erin Krengel Erin Krengel
Protecting Your APIs with Lambda Authorizers and Pulumi

Creating serverless applications just got even easier! You can now protect your application APIs in just three easy steps. We’ve already posted about how easy it is to create serverless apps in Pulumi. Now, we’re helping you simplify protecting those apps with API Gateway and Lambda authorizers.

With Pulumi’s new AWSX package, you can quickly define a Lambda and an AWS Lambda authorizer to protect it. We’re once again harnessing the power of Lambdas as Lambdas to allow developers to focus on writing code.

Today, we will walkthrough creating a simple serverless app using AWS and Pulumi. We will simplify implementing the OAuth protocol by using Auth0 and AWS Lambda authorizers to authorize users. Auth0 provides a universal authentication and authorization platform for applications. It has become an extremely popular platform for user management because Auth0 makes OAuth easy.

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Announcing Per User Pricing and Unlimited Stacks for Teams

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy

Since launching last year, thousands of users and hundreds of companies, from startups to Fortune 500 Enterprises, have chosen Pulumi for cloud applications and infrastructure delivery across AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, and Kubernetes. Today we are announcing important changes to better align our product and pricing with how we’ve heard you want to use Pulumi in production. We’re optimistic that these changes will help companies of all sizes choose Pulumi, enabling their teams to deliver cloud applications and infrastructure faster and more reliably.

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Testing Your Infrastructure as Code with Pulumi

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Testing Your Infrastructure as Code with Pulumi

Using Pulumi and general purpose languages for infrastructure as code comes with many benefits: leveraging existing skills and knowledge, eliminating boilerplate through abstraction, and using the same ecosystem of tools like IDEs and linters that your team already knows and loves. In general, these are all attributes of software engineering, which not only make us more productive, but also improve the quality of our code. It’s only natural, therefore, that using general purpose languages unlocks another important software engineering practice: testing.

In this article, we will see the many ways in which Pulumi lets us test our infrastructure as code.

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Simple Serverless programming with Google Cloud Functions and Pulumi

Cyrus Najmabadi Cyrus Najmabadi

Pulumi lets you create, deploy, and manage Google Cloud applications and infrastructure in familiar languages like JavaScript, TypeScript, and Python, and without needing to learn new DSLs or YAML templating solutions. This means great productivity and getting to use tools you already know and love. Since serverless is all about focusing more on your application code, and less on infrastructure and configuration toil, we absolutely love Google Functions.

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