Announcing CrossGuard Preview

Erin Krengel Erin Krengel βˆ™
Announcing CrossGuard Preview

Over the past few months, we have been hard at work on Pulumi CrossGuard, a Policy as Code solution. Using CrossGuard, you can express flexible business and security rules using code. CrossGuard enables organization administrators to enforce these policies across their organization or just on specific stacks. CrossGuard allows you to verify or enforce custom policies on changes before they are applied to your resources. CrossGuard is 100% open source and available to all users of Pulumi, including the Community Edition. Advanced organization-wide policy management features are available to Team Pro and Enterprise customers.

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Pulumi Sweeps into KubeCon

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina βˆ™
Pulumi Sweeps into KubeCon

We had a fantastic time at KubeCon in San Diego. At the event, the Pulumi team released two technology previews: Pulumi Crosswalk for Kubernetes and Pulumi Query for Kubernetes. Crosswalk for Kubernetes is a set of common patterns compiled in playbooks. These patterns reduce the complex Kubernetes API syntax by providing trusted defaults with idiomatic Kubernetes. Checkout a quick introduction to Crosswalk for Kubernetes in this blog post. Sara Novotny defined observability as β€œthe ability to ask of your system and learn from it” during her keynote with Liz Fong-Jones.

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Inside Crosswalk for Kubernetes

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina βˆ™
Inside Crosswalk for Kubernetes

Running Kubernetes in production can be challenging. This past year, Pulumi has collected common patterns of usage informed by best practices for provisioning Kubernetes infrastructure and running containerized applications. We call this Pulumi Crosswalk for Kubernetes: a collection of playbooks and libraries to help you to successfully configure, deploy, and manage Kubernetes in a way that works for teams in production. Kubernetes is Vast and Complex Kubernetes is the standard multi-cloud platform for modern containerized applications.

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Introducing Pulumi Query for Kubernetes

Alex Clemmer Alex Clemmer βˆ™
Introducing Pulumi Query for Kubernetes

We often need answers to simple questions about Kubernetes resources. Questions like: How many distinct versions of MySQL are running in my cluster? Which Pods are scheduled on nodes with high memory pressure? Which Pods are publicly exposed to the internet via a load-balanced Service? Each of these questions would normally be answered by invoking kubectl multiple times to list resources of each type, and manually parsing the output to join it together into a single report.

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Introducing kx: Kubernetes for Everyone

Levi Blackstone Levi Blackstone βˆ™
Introducing kx: Kubernetes for Everyone

Kubernetes provides a rich, standards-based API that works across cloud and on-premise infrastructure. However, many of the API fields are deeply nested and require users to specify the same values redundantly across different resources. While this explicit specification is necessary for Kubernetes to operate, this often leads users to copy-paste existing code to manage the boilerplate. Today, as part of our Crosswalk for Kubernetes announcement, we’re introducing the Kubernetes Extensions (kx) library for Pulumi.

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A Year of Helping Build Production-Ready Kubernetes

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy βˆ™
A Year of Helping Build Production-Ready Kubernetes

Today we announced Pulumi Crosswalk for Kubernetes, a collection of open source tools, libraries, and playbooks to help developers and operators work together to bring Kubernetes into their organizations. They capture the lessons we learned this past year working with organizations to go from zero to Kubernetes in production for their infrastructure and application workloads. By releasing these as open source, we hope to help everybody be more successful with their Kubernetes projects — as we have learned through experience, it isn’t easy going!

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Infrastructure as Code with .NET and Pulumi

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina βˆ™
Infrastructure as Code with .NET and Pulumi

With the release of Pulumi for .NET preview, we’ve open the doors to infrastructure as code to even more developers and operators. Millions of .NET developers can now use their favorite languages and open source ecosystems to build modern, cloud native applications. We’ve added support for C#, F#, and Visual Basic. Because .NET Core is available on Windows, Linux, and macOS, you have a choice of platforms to use.

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Pulumi πŸ’œ .NET Core

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy βˆ™
Pulumi πŸ’œ .NET Core

Today we are excited to announce the Preview of .NET Core support for all of your modern infrastructure as code needs. This means you can create, deploy, and manage your infrastructure, on any cloud, using your favorite .NET language, including C#, F#, and VB.NET.

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Three Infrastructure as Code Blog Posts You Should Read

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina βˆ™
Three Infrastructure as Code Blog Posts You Should Read

We are always excited when people join the Infrastructure as Code community and write about their experiences. Pulumi can be used for a range of common tasks such as standardizing VPC builds, building VSphere virtual machines, or deploying your infrastructure from a CI/CD pipeline. Whether it’s TypeScript, JavaScript, or Python you can build your infrastructure with your language and tools of choice. Here are three new blog posts that show how to use Pulumi with code examples to perform these tasks.

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Continuous Delivery on Octopus Deploy using Pulumi

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina βˆ™
Continuous Delivery on Octopus Deploy using Pulumi

Continuous delivery is about making changes in your application and getting them into production securely, quickly, and consistently. Pulumi’s infrastructure as code approach uses source code to model cloud resources, making it ideal for continuous delivery. Your infrastructure code can share the same process as your application code including running unit and integration tests, performing code reviews via Pull Requests, and examining your infrastructure using linters or static analysis tools.

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