Posts Tagged github-actions

How Elkjøp Nordic enables self-service infrastructure for developers

How Elkjøp Nordic enables self-service infrastructure for developers

At PulumiUP 2022, Tomas Jansson, software architect at Elkjøp Nordic, gave a presentation on how to enable developers to self-service infrastructure by using Pulumi’s Automation API. Elkjøp Nordic is the leading consumer electronics retailer in the Nordics. The company sells consumer electronics, mobile phones, computers, white goods, domestic appliances, and services linked to these products both directly to consumers and to businesses. It is an omnichannel retailer and serves customers both online and through more than 400 stores.

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How we manage GitHub at Pulumi with Pulumi

How we manage GitHub at Pulumi with Pulumi

Ah, GitHub. The home of all developers. The place where we share code. The world’s most awkward social media site. The secret LinkedIn for techies. The tool we use for company org structure, work planning, code ownership, and permissions…

Wait.

That’s quite a lot.

GitHub is good at many things, but a full-on organization management tool it is not.

Have you ever needed your manager to manually enable admin permission on a repo for you?
Or have you needed to page the CEO to add you to a team, because your manager was out that day?
Have you ever wondered who is on what team? Or which team owns a repo?
What if you change teams, or a team changes names? A reorg happens, and the “platform-integrations” team is no more, but we still need to call it that on GitHub because it is the team with all the repository accesses?

When I joined Pulumi in 2021, all of the above happened to me within my first few weeks.

We at Pulumi wanted to reduce this kind of management friction, and we decided to solve it the Pulumi way: with declarative infrastructure using the Pulumi GitHub provider.

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Infrastructure CI/CD With Github Actions and Pulumi

Infrastructure CI/CD With Github Actions and Pulumi

GitHub Actions help automate tasks within your software development life cycle. At Pulumi, we use GitHub Actions internally as part of every build/release cycle, and we run these tasks many, many times per day. This helps us to automate our CI/CD process and eliminate manual steps. Pulumi and many of our customers also deliver infrastructure resources as part of a CI/CD process: delivering infrastructure and applications in a single, integrated pipeline.

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Deploying an OAuth Server for Netlify's CMS

Deploying an OAuth Server for Netlify's CMS

In our previous post, we deployed our CMS app on AWS instead of Netlify. We couldn’t use Netlify’s Identity Service, which manages GitHub access to Netlify CMS, because we deployed on AWS. As a result, we needed to implement an external OAuth Server.

We used Netlify’s Go example to deploy on ECS Fargate and configure the domain and certificate. To deploy the application on Fargate, we used a Typescript Pulumi project. This is a polyglot application where the OAuth server is implemented in Go and the infrastructure is deployed with Typescript. We’ll show how we accomplished the deployment.

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Deploying Netlify CMS on AWS with Pulumi

Deploying Netlify CMS on AWS with Pulumi

Netlify CMS is an open-source content management system that provides UI for editing content and adopting Git workflow. Initially, we want to take advantage of it to increase efficiency to edit Pulumi’s website. However, during development, we found few examples are deploying the CMS application on AWS instead of Netlify, its home platform. Therefore, in this blog post, we would like to share how to organize Netlify’s file structure and use Pulumi to store the content on S3 buckets, connect to CloudFront, and configure certificate in Certificate Manager.

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