Posts Tagged kubernetes

Announcing New Pulumi Open Source Projects for Kubernetes

Announcing New Pulumi Open Source Projects for Kubernetes

Today, we’re excited to announce several new open source projects that advance Pulumi’s Kubernetes support. These projects and features have been developed while helping leading cloud native engineering teams like Snowflake, Lemonade, and Mercedes-Benz go into production with Kubernetes, and include new deployment automation options, improved ecosystem integrations, and tools to make it easier than ever to adopt Pulumi for new and existing projects.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Day 2

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Day 2

Your application made it out of the dev stage, passed the testing stage, and arrived in production. As a developer, you might think that it’s an ops problem now. However, DevOps is a collaborative effort between developers and operators to build and maintain applications using shared techniques and processes, often called “Day 2” activities.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Networking

In previous installments, we examined how to deploy applications. However, we only touched on how applications talk to each other inside and outside the cluster. Whether you are building a modern application or modernizing a legacy application, understanding how resources and components talk to each other is essential. In this installment, we’ll examine networking in Kubernetes.

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Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

Getting Started with Kubernetes: Stateful Applications

This article is the fourth in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. This series walks you through:

In the previous post, we examined different methods for deploying applications. We worked through examples of a boilerplate deployment, to one using ComponentResources to automate deployment further, and deploying with Helm charts. In this installment, we’ll look at how to deploy stateful applications, such as databases, in Kubernetes. Unlike stateless applications, stateful apps require persistent storage, which presents scaling and availability challenges.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Advanced Deployment

Welcome to the third article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. In the previous post, we reviewed basic Kubernetes objects and abstractions used when deploying an application. We examined code examples across the cloud providers to show how to use infrastructure as code to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects. In this installment, we’ll progress from a simple deployment with just a single application container to a complex application with multiple containers and Pods.

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Announcing Kustomize Support

Announcing Kustomize Support

Kubernetes is complex, and there are many ways to manage Kubernetes resources. Pulumi supports many of these options, including native code SDKs, YAML, Helm, and now, Kustomize. There’s no need to rewrite your existing configurations to get started with Pulumi. You can efficiently adopt existing resources to deploy your modern application and save time and effort.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Welcome to the second article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. The series walks you through building a Kubernetes cluster on cloud providers, deploying applications, and “Day 2” activities such as migrating Node groups. In the previous article, we showed how to create a Kubernetes cluster for AWS, Azure, and GCP. In this installment, we’ll learn how to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Containers solved the problem of moving software from one environment to another because they encapsulate all the software dependencies. However, an orchestration platform is needed to manage containers at scale. Kubernetes is a popular open-source solution that uses declarative configuration to specify the desired state of the application. Configuring and deploying an application on Kubernetes is often accomplished with YAML files to define the state and command line tools to manage and control the Kubernetes API. This article demonstrates how to use infrastructure as code to create basic Kubernetes objects and higher-level abstractions that build upon the basic objects.

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What's new in Pulumi 2.0 for Kubernetes

What's new in Pulumi 2.0 for Kubernetes

We recently announced the 2.0 release of Pulumi which includes parity for Node.js (JavaScript, TypeScript), Python, .NET (C#, F#, etc) and Go, and improvements to Kubernetes and dozens of other supported cloud resource providers.

Kubernetes support in Pulumi spans orchestration of clusters and application workloads. Clusters can be managed by cloud providers or self-managed. Workloads use the same Kubernetes API to create and manage API resources in the supported Pulumi languages through packages directly generated from the OpenAPI specification.

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Winning with Pulumi Superpowers and Kubernetes

Winning with Pulumi Superpowers and Kubernetes

You’ve containerized your application, and it’s running great on your desktop using Docker Compose or Swarm. But now it’s time to test it locally with minikube and then put it into production with Kubernetes. Manifests are a bit like Compose files - it’s just YAML, right?

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