Announcing Kustomize Support

Levi Blackstone Levi Blackstone
Announcing Kustomize Support

Kubernetes is complex, and there are many ways to manage Kubernetes resources. Pulumi supports many of these options, including native code SDKs, YAML, Helm, and now, Kustomize. There’s no need to rewrite your existing configurations to get started with Pulumi. You can efficiently adopt existing resources to deploy your modern application and save time and effort.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started With Kubernetes: Application Basics

Welcome to the second article in a series using infrastructure as code to deploy applications with Kubernetes. The series walks you through building a Kubernetes cluster on cloud providers, deploying applications, and “Day 2” activities such as migrating Node groups. In the previous article, we showed how to create a Kubernetes cluster for AWS, Azure, and GCP. In this installment, we’ll learn how to deploy an application using Kubernetes objects.

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Introducing New Slimmer Docker Images

Lee Briggs Lee Briggs
Introducing New Slimmer Docker Images

One of the most exciting aspects of using Pulumi can also present some interesting engineering challenges. Pulumi supports three operating systems, multiple programming languages, and almost 40 different providers. This means creating tooling that works effortlessly across all possible user scenarios can often throw unexpected challenges our way.

Nowhere are these challenges more prevalent than in the Pulumi Docker containers.

The pulumi/pulumi Docker container is almost 3Gb uncompressed, which is generally considered large for a Docker image. In this post, I’ll examine why this container has grown to the size that it is, and talk about how we hope to solve it.

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Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Getting Started With Kubernetes: Clusters and Nodes

Containers solved the problem of moving software from one environment to another because they encapsulate all the software dependencies. However, an orchestration platform is needed to manage containers at scale. Kubernetes is a popular open-source solution that uses declarative configuration to specify the desired state of the application. Configuring and deploying an application on Kubernetes is often accomplished with YAML files to define the state and command line tools to manage and control the Kubernetes API. This article demonstrates how to use infrastructure as code to create basic Kubernetes objects and higher-level abstractions that build upon the basic objects.

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Unlocking Spinnaker With Pulumi

Praneet Loke Praneet Loke
Unlocking Spinnaker With Pulumi

Spinnaker is an open source, multi-cloud continuous delivery platform for releasing software changes with high velocity and confidence. This makes it a perfect fit for Pulumi to unleash the power of Spinnaker and its continuous delivery capabilities to all of the providers that Pulumi supports today and in the future. We have written a developer guide showing you how to install the plugin in your Spinnaker instance and start using it right away.

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Using Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) with AWS Lambda

Luke Hoban Luke Hoban
Using Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) with AWS Lambda

Ever since AWS Lambda was released in 2015, users have wanted persistent file storage beyond the small 512MB /tmp disk allocated to each Lambda function. The following year, Amazon launched EFS, offering a simple managed file system service for AWS, but initially only available to mount onto Amazon EC2 instances. Over the last few months, AWS has been extending access to EFS to all of the modern compute offerings. First EKS for Kubernetes, then ECS and Fargate for containers. Today, AWS announced that EFS is now also supported in Lambda, providing easy access to network file systems from your serverless functions.

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Policy as Code with Python

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Policy as Code with Python

Policy as Code for Python is now GA in Pulumi 2.0. Policies written in code let you test, automate deployment, and enable version control. Python is a popular scripting language used for machine learning and artificial intelligence, data science, web development, and devops. It’s an ideal language for developers and operators to use in common.

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Unit Testing Assets

Lee Zen Lee Zen
Unit Testing Assets

When deploying infrastructure, we want to ensure that what we’re deploying matches our expectations. One way to do so is via unit testing. We’ve talked about this concept in previous posts, such as in this overview and this post on deployments with .NET.

Often, when we’re creating cloud resources, we want to ensure that a resource’s underlying assets match certain properties. For example, the entrypoint or handler for a cloud function should be an executable function. Similarly, objects we’ll serve as static assets on a website should not exceed a certain size. We can use Pulumi’s unit testing framework along with language-specific constructs such as introspection or filesystem calls to ensure this type of correctness. We’ll walk through some examples to show just how easy it is to do so.

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Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Building Jamstack Infrastructure With Pulumi

A Jamstack is a modern architecture for building websites; JAM stands for JavaScript, APIs, and Markup. Jamstacks are deployed on a CDN, and content is stored on a cloud services provider. In addition to the speed and simplicity of deploying static content served from a CDN, there are other advantages such as maintaining content with git, modern build tools to generate the static content, automated builds, atomic deploys, and instant cache validation.

While build tools have simplified the process of creating content ready for deployment on a CDN, creating the infrastructure to serve the content remains complicated. You can use a cloud provider’s web interface or script the build using a CLI tool if you want to manage your infrastructure instead of using a hosted solution. The alternative is to use infrastructure as code tool to automate building and deploying cloud resources. This article demonstrates how to create a jamstack website and deploy it on AWS using Pulumi.

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What's new in Pulumi 2.0 for Kubernetes

Mike Metral Mike Metral
What's new in Pulumi 2.0 for Kubernetes

We recently announced the 2.0 release of Pulumi which includes parity for Node.js (JavaScript, TypeScript), Python, .NET (C#, F#, etc) and Go, and improvements to Kubernetes and dozens of other supported cloud resource providers and packages.

Kubernetes support in Pulumi spans orchestration of clusters and application workloads. Clusters can be managed by cloud providers or self-managed. Workloads use the same Kubernetes API to create and manage API resources in the supported Pulumi languages through packages directly generated from the OpenAPI specification.

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