Deploy Infrastructure to Multiple Cloud Regions at Once

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Deploy Infrastructure to Multiple Cloud Regions at Once

Pulumi makes it easy to flexibly deploy your cloud infrastructure using code. Usually deployments encompass a single slack and a single region in your cloud of choice. If you need to go multi-region, that usually means creating a stack per-region, which Pulumi’s configuration system makes easy. A stack per region isn’t required, though! Sometimes we want a single stack to span regions for performance, scalability, resilience, or just hard requirements. In these cases, Pulumi can seamlessly orchestrate deployments to, or even across, multiple regions, accounts, or clusters. In this article, we’ll see this in action by provisioning an AWS RDS primary database into one region and a read replica in an entirely different region – all from a single Pulumi program, stack, and pulumi up incantation.

Read more →

Manage Shared Kubernetes Resources Safely with Pulumi

Levi Blackstone Levi Blackstone
Manage Shared Kubernetes Resources Safely with Pulumi

Kubernetes resources often have more than one controller making changes to them. These controllers can include kubectl, the Kubernetes control plane, custom operators, or infrastructure as code (IaC) tools like Pulumi. With the v3.20.1 release of the Kubernetes provider, you have some powerful new options for managing shared resources in Kubernetes. In this post, we show you how Pulumi can help you work with shared resources safely and effectively.

Read more →

Improved Pulumi experience with .NET 6

Zaid Ajaj Zaid Ajaj
Improved Pulumi experience with .NET 6

In this blog post, we will talk about how Pulumi is now using .NET 6, the latest Long-Term Support version of .NET, as our default across the ecosystem. We will discuss the changes applied to templates, program structure and code generation. We also explain how Pulumi C# projects can benefit from the latest features in .NET 6 and how it simplifies your programs overall. Let’s dive in, shall we?

Read more →

Attribute-Based Access Controls for AWS Lambda Functions

Paul Stack Paul Stack Lee Briggs Lee Briggs Isaac Harris Isaac Harris
Attribute-Based Access Controls for AWS Lambda Functions

Event-driven, serverless functions have become a defining feature of many modern cloud architectures. With recent capabilities such as AWS Lambda URLs and AWS Lambda Containers, AWS has made it clear that Lambda Functions are a platform that teams can use to deliver increasingly sophisticated services without worrying about managing underlying compute resources. Today, AWS announced another advancement for their Lambda Functions platform: Attribute-Based Access Control (ABAC). At its core, ABAC support brings more granular permissions that are automatically applied based on IAM role tags, Lambda tags, or both.

Read more →

Enhanced static-code analysis for C# projects

Zaid Ajaj Zaid Ajaj
Enhanced static-code analysis for C# projects

When I started using Pulumi for the first time, I used C# as my language of choice for defining infrastructure. I start by creating resources and providing their parameters through argument objects. The IDE helps me out with auto-completions and type errors as I go but the compiler didn’t always detect some of the errors I eventually came across.

Read more →

Deploy Static Websites to AWS using 10 lines of YAML

Sean Holung Sean Holung
Deploy Static Websites to AWS using 10 lines of YAML

The AWS Static Website component makes it easy to deploy an AWS S3 static website and, optionally, add a CloudFront content distribution network (CDN). While you can use any of the programming languages Pulumi supports (TypeScript, JavaScript, Python, Go, .NET, Java, and YAML), the component is particularly useful if you use YAML or JSON. With the AWS Static Website component, you’ll have a complete, functioning site in a few minutes. Without it, you can spend hours or even days to get the same result.

Read more →

Deploying Amazon EKS Anywhere on Bare Metal

David Flanagan David Flanagan
Deploying Amazon EKS Anywhere on Bare Metal

Some of the largest and most complex deployments that teams manage are hybrid and multi-cloud deployments. Kubernetes is a common component in these deployments because it enables platform teams to provide a common set of services across cloud and on-premises infrastructure and simplifies the process of migrating and scaling workloads as demand fluctuates. Pulumi simplifies these deployment scenarios but teams often need to manage different flavors of Kubernetes for on-premises deployments versus cloud deployments.

Read more →

How Elkjøp Nordic enables self-service infrastructure for developers

George Huang George Huang
How Elkjøp Nordic enables self-service infrastructure for developers

At PulumiUP 2022, Tomas Jansson, software architect at Elkjøp Nordic, gave a presentation on how to enable developers to self-service infrastructure by using Pulumi’s Automation API. Elkjøp Nordic is the leading consumer electronics retailer in the Nordics. The company sells consumer electronics, mobile phones, computers, white goods, domestic appliances, and services linked to these products both directly to consumers and to businesses. It is an omnichannel retailer and serves customers both online and through more than 400 stores.

Read more →

Shared configuration stacks with AWS Systems Manager

Christian Nunciato Christian Nunciato
Shared configuration stacks with AWS Systems Manager

One thing I love about Pulumi is how easy it is to configure a stack. As a builder mainly of web applications, I’m always thinking about how I’ll configure my apps from one environment to the next, and being able to use Pulumi’s built-in support for configuration and secrets to manage the API keys and database credentials for my dev, staging, and production stacks individually is incredibly convenient. For larger teams and organizations, though, where multiple applications rely on a set of common configuration settings — dozens of apps, say, depending on the the same API service or database — having to keep all of those config settings in sync across all of those individually can become a bit of a pain.

Read more →