Run Your Own RSS Server on AWS with Pulumi

Christian Nunciato Christian Nunciato
Run Your Own RSS Server on AWS with Pulumi

It’s been a few years since Google shut down Google Reader, and while a number of nice commercial alternatives have sprung in its wake, none of them has ever been quite the right fit for me personally.

So a while back, after far too much time spent wandering the blogsphere manually, typing URLs into address bars by hand, I decided to go looking to see whether the universe had produced an open-source solution to this problem — and to my surprise and delight, it had! Miniflux is an excellent little open-source RSS server and reader, written in Go and backed by PostgreSQL, that also happens to be packaged as a Docker container. So in this post, I’ll show how easy it is to deploy a Miniflux server of your own on AWS, using only Pulumi and a few lines of TypeScript.

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Infrastructure as Code Resource Naming

Eric Rudder Eric Rudder
Infrastructure as Code Resource Naming

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” William Shakespeare’s oft repeated quote was used to help Juliet explain that a “Montague” is worthy of love. Juliet may have underestimated the importance of a name, however, since things didn’t work out so well for everyone in Verona! Many customers have questions about “names” in Pulumi – and in an effort to make sure that things work out better for them than they did for Romeo, here’s a quick note on naming!

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Pulumi 1.0

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Pulumi 1.0

Today we are excited to announce the general availability of Pulumi 1.0. Pulumi is a modern infrastructure as code tool that lets you declare infrastructure using real languages, with a SaaS management console for configuring identities, organizations, and related policies. By using real languages, developers and operators are able to work better together, sharing and reusing best practices, accomplishing new levels of automation, and unlocking access to ecosystems of existing tools.

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Ten Pearls With Azure Functions in Pulumi

Mikhail Shilkov Mikhail Shilkov
Ten Pearls With Azure Functions in Pulumi

In this post, we’ll take a look at 10 “pearls”—bite-sized code snippets—that demonstrate using Pulumi to build serverless applications with Azure Functions and infrastructure as code. These pearls are organized into four categories, each demonstrating a unique scenario:

  • Function App Deployment: Deploy an existing Azure Functions application using infrastructure as code.
  • HTTP Functions as Callbacks: Mix JavaScript or TypeScript functions with your infrastructure definition to produce strongly-typed, self-contained, serverless HTTP endpoints.
  • Cloud Event Handling: Leverage a variety of event sources available to Azure Functions with lightweight event handlers.
  • Data Flows with Function Bindings: Take advantage of function bindings—declarative connectors to Azure services.

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GitHub And Pulumi Join Forces To Ensure Your Pulumi Tokens Are Safe

Praneet Loke Praneet Loke
GitHub And Pulumi Join Forces To Ensure Your Pulumi Tokens Are Safe

We are very excited to announce that we have partnered with GitHub to offer our users better protection for their Pulumi Access Tokens.

By default, Pulumi users manage the state of their cloud infrastructure deployments using https://app.pulumi.com. This service provides state storage, concurrency control, audit history and access controls for both individuals and teams working with Pulumi. Each user and service account can generate one or more Pulumi Access Tokens to be used to authenticate with this service. These access tokens can be used on both local development machines, as well as in CI/CD systems for automated infrastructure deployments. These access tokens are sensitive secrets which should never be shared publicly, and in particular should never be committed to source control.

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Adopting Existing Cloud Resources into Pulumi

Luke Hoban Luke Hoban
Adopting Existing Cloud Resources into Pulumi

Most cloud infrastructure projects involve working with existing cloud resources — either building on top of existing resources or adopting existing resources under management with a new and more robust infrastructure provisioning solution.

Whether you are adopting resources that were deployed manually using your cloud provider’s console or CLI — or migrating existing infrastructure from tools like Terraform or CloudFormation — Pulumi makes it easy to adopt and manage your existing resources.

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Multicloud Kubernetes: Running Apps Across EKS, AKS, and GKE

Mike Metral Mike Metral
Multicloud Kubernetes: Running Apps Across EKS, AKS, and GKE

Kubernetes clusters from the managed offerings of AWS EKS, Azure AKS, and GCP GKE all vary in configuration, management, and resource properties. This variance creates unnecessary complexity in cluster provisioning and app deployments, as well as for CI/CD and testing.

Additionally, if you wanted to deploy the same app across multiple clusters for specific use cases or test scenarios across providers, subtleties such as LoadBalancer outputs and cluster connection settings can be a nuisance to manage.

In this post, we’ll see how to use Pulumi to deploy the kuard app across EKS, AKS, GKE and a local Kubernetes cluster, such as Docker Desktop or a self-managed cluster. We’ll spin up the clusters in each provider, launch the app, and manage both cluster and app using the TypeScript programming language.

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7 Ways to Deal with Application Secrets in Azure

Mikhail Shilkov Mikhail Shilkov
7 Ways to Deal with Application Secrets in Azure

Every non-trivial application relies on configuration values that may depend on the current execution environment. Some of these values contain sensitive information that shouldn’t be shared publicly. In general, the fewer parties that have access to those secret values, the safer the application will be—in fact, in an ideal world, no one would be granted direct access to those secrets.

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Day 2 Kubernetes: Migrating EKS Node Groups with Zero Downtime

Mike Metral Mike Metral
Day 2 Kubernetes: Migrating EKS Node Groups with Zero Downtime

Managed Kubernetes offerings greatly reduce the overhead required in administering Kubernetes. However, the cluster is only one of the components under management, as app lifecycles are self-driven tasks that vary by workloads.

In Kubernetes, node groups are a useful mechanism for creating pools of resources that can enforce scheduling requirements. They also provide a utility for shifting workloads around during cluster management and updates.

In this post, we’ll see how to use Pulumi for Day 2 Kubernetes administration. We’ll spin up a new EKS cluster with two node groups and a given workload. Then we’ll add one more node group with an updated configuration, and migrate the workload over to it with zero downtime using code and kubectl.

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