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Getting Started with Amazon EKS Distro & Pulumi

Luke Hoban Luke Hoban Lee Briggs Lee Briggs
Getting Started with Amazon EKS Distro & Pulumi

As Kubernetes grows in popularity, the number of options for Kubernetes users continues to increase. Providers of managed Kubernetes offerings will often learn lessons about operating large numbers of clusters at scale; it’s increasingly common that they will contribute this knowledge back to the ecosystem, allowing those organizations who need more control and flexibility to reap the benefits.

With the announcement of the Amazon EKS Distro during AWS re:Invent, the Amazon EKS team has contributed back to the cloud-native community in a big way. In this post, we’ll take a brief look at what the Amazon EKS Distro is, explore why you might choose this over current managed service offerings and finally, explore how you can get started with the Amazon EKS Distro on day 1 using Pulumi.

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Running Container Images in AWS Lambda

Mikhail Shilkov Mikhail Shilkov
Running Container Images in AWS Lambda

When AWS Lambda launched in 2014, it pioneered the concept of Function-as-a-Service. Developers could write a function in one of the supported programming languages, upload it to AWS, and Lambda executes the function on every invocation.

Ever since then, a zip archive of application code or binaries has been the only supported deployment option. Even AWS Lambda Layers—reusable components automatically merged into the application code—used the zip packaging format.

Today, AWS announced that AWS Lambda now supports packaging serverless functions as container images. This means that you can deploy a custom Docker or OCI image as an AWS Lambda function.

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Pulumi container images now available on Amazon ECR Public

Paul Stack Paul Stack
Pulumi container images now available on Amazon ECR Public

At re:Invent, the AWS team unveiled the new Amazon Elastic Container Registry Public (Amazon ECR Public), creating a new option for users in publishing and pulling public container images. Pulumi fully supports Amazon ECR Public in two ways:

  1. Official Pulumi container images are available today on Amazon ECR Public.
  2. Pulumi is the easiest way to package and publish your container images, and we’ll support publishing your container images to Amazon ECR Public very soon.

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Pulumi Import: Generate IaC for Existing Cloud Resources

Paul Stack Paul Stack
Pulumi Import: Generate IaC for Existing Cloud Resources

Most infrastructure projects require working with existing cloud resources, either by building on top of existing resources or adopting existing resources under management with a new and more robust infrastructure provisioning solution.

In June 2019, Pulumi introduced the ability to import existing infrastructure resources to be under Pulumi management no matter how you’ve provisioned these resources — manually in your cloud provider’s console or CLI, using an infrastructure as code tool like Terraform or AWS CloudFormation. Today, we are happy to announce a richer resource import experience.

As of v2.12.0, Pulumi has introduced a pulumi import command. This command will import the cloud resource into the Pulumi state and generate the code for the user’s Pulumi program in the appropriate language.

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Orchestrating Cloud Workflows with Automation API

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Orchestrating Cloud Workflows with Automation API

There are many moving parts when deploying infrastructure and applications. Playbooks are step-by-step maps that standardize how infrastructure and applications are deployed across your organization. Typically playbooks describe every action to build and deploy, requiring an operator to complete each step before moving on to the next. It’s a process that can be tedious and prone to human error.

What if you could encapsulate a playbook into a single action? This is the promise of declarative infrastructure. You declare the desired state of your infrastructure and the infrastructure as code engine builds the infrastructure. However, you must still deploy the application and perform maintenance, and this is where you hit the limits of templating languages and where programming languages excel. In this hands-on article, we’ll demonstrate how to use Pulumi’s Automation API to create a program that builds infrastructure, installs an application, and can perform application maintenance.

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Build Self-Service Cloud Infrastructure with Automation API

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Build Self-Service Cloud Infrastructure with Automation API

If you could create infrastructure without using a cloud provider’s console, a CLI, or a templating engine, what would you build? Pulumi’s Automation API lets you create declarative infrastructure defined by your best practices and expose it behind a REST, gRPC, or custom API.

So just what is Automation API? Think of it as Pulumi’s infrastructure as code engine as an SDK. Instead of writing code and using the CLI to declare infrastructure, you can directly tell the engine to build your infrastructure. This means that you’re using the same declarative IaC tooling with the predictability, robustness, safety, and desired state management, except it has a new programmatic surface area. Imagine building an application that creates infrastructure via a REST interface. Get ready, because that’s what we’re going to do.

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Pulumi raises Series B to build the future of Cloud Engineering

Joe Duffy Joe Duffy
Pulumi raises Series B to build the future of Cloud Engineering

Today I’m thrilled to announce that we’ve raised $37.5 million in Series B funding led by NEA with participation from existing investors, Madrona Venture Group and Tola Capital. We will use this funding to continue serving our fast-growing community of developers and infrastructure practitioners, making Cloud Engineering the new reality for organizations embracing the modern cloud in all aspects of how they ship software.

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Policy as Code for Any Cloud Provider

Sophia Parafina Sophia Parafina
Policy as Code for Any Cloud Provider

Policies protect your infrastructure by controlling access, set limits that reduce the blast radius of an incident, and manage infrastructure operations. Policies are commonly created through a form on a cloud provider’s administrative console, making replicating or versioning the policy more difficult. With Policy as Code, you can apply software engineering practices such as automated testing, deployment, and version control when creating policies.

CrossGuard is Pulumi’s Policy as Code solution that lets you create, verify, apply, and enforce policies. Policies are standalone packages that can be run against any Pulumi stack. That means your policies are language agnostic and work with any language supported by Pulumi. Policy Packages are policy bundles that evaluate every resource in your stack, whether deployed in AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, or Kubernetes.

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